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Financial development : structure and dynamics

  • de la Torre, Augusto
  • Feyen, Erik
  • Ize, Alain

This paper analyzes the bright and dark sides of the financial development process through the lenses of the four fundamental frictions to which agents are exposed -- information asymmetry, enforcement, collective action, and collective cognition. Financial development is shaped by the efforts of market participants to grind down or circumvent these frictions, a process further spurred by financial innovation and scale and network effects. The analysis leads to broad predictions regarding the sequencing and convexity of the dynamic paths for a battery of financial development indicators. The method used also yields a robust way to benchmark the financial development paths followed by individual countries or regions. The paper explores the reasons for path deviations and gaps relative to the benchmark. Demand-related effects (past output growth), financial crashes, and supply-related effects (the quality of the enabling environment) all play an important role. Informational frictions are easier to overcome than contractual frictions, not least because of the transferability of financial innovation across borders.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5854.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5854
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  1. Rocco Huang & Lev Ratnovski, 2009. "The dark side of bank wholesale funding," Working Papers 09-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  2. Jean Arcand & Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza, 2015. "Too much finance?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 105-148, June.
  3. Barry Eichengreen & Ricardo Hausmann & Ugo Panizza, 2007. "Currency Mismatches, Debt Intolerance, and the Original Sin: Why They Are Not the Same and Why It Matters," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 121-170 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Nicola Gennaioli & Andrei Shleifer and Robert Vishny, 2015. "Neglected Risks, Financial Innovation, and Financial Fragility," Working Papers 502, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  5. Maurer, Noel & Haber, Stephen, 2007. "Related Lending and Economic Performance: Evidence from Mexico," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 67(03), pages 551-581, September.
  6. Rafael LaPorta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, . "Law and Finance," Working Paper 19451, Harvard University OpenScholar.
  7. Holmstrom, B & Tirole, J, 1996. "Private and Public Supply of Liquidity," Working papers 96-21, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  8. de la Torre, Augusto & Ize, Alain, 2011. "Containing systemic risk : paradigm-based perspectives on regulatory reform," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5523, The World Bank.
  9. Augusto de la Torre & Alain Ize, 2010. "Regulatory Reform: Integrating Paradigms," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 109-139, 03.
  10. Josh Lerner & Peter Tufano, 2011. "The Consequences of Financial Innovation: A Counterfactual Research Agenda," NBER Chapters, in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity Revisited, pages 523-575 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Caprio, Gerard & Honohan, Patrick, 2001. "Finance for Growth: Policy Choices in a Volatile World," MPRA Paper 9929, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Robert C. Merton & Zvi Bodie, 2004. "The Design of Financial Systems: Towards a Synthesis of Function and Structure," NBER Working Papers 10620, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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