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Trust and trustworthiness with singleton groups


  • Fabio Galeotti

    (School of Economics, University of East Anglia)

  • Daniel John Zizzo

    (School of Economics, University of East Anglia)


We present an experiment investigating the effects of having an individual identified as a singleton group. The presence of a singleton group reduces trustworthiness. The majority group members discriminate against the singled out group member when they are not responsible of the distinct status of this person. When the singleton group member is identified based on negative characteristics, he or she returns significantly less. Overall, having singleton groups has no benefits for trust and is potentially disruptive for trustworthiness.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Galeotti & Daniel John Zizzo, 2012. "Trust and trustworthiness with singleton groups," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 12-03, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
  • Handle: RePEc:uea:wcbess:12-03

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chakravarty, Surajeet & Fonseca, Miguel A., 2014. "The effect of social fragmentation on public good provision: An experimental study," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 1-9.

    More about this item


    Justification; trust games; groups; responsibility;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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