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What happens if you single out? An experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Fabio Galeotti

    (University of East Anglia - University of East Anglia, GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Université Jean Monnet - Saint-Etienne - PRES Université de Lyon - CNRS)

  • Daniel John Zizzo

    (University of Newcastle, UK)

We present an experiment investigating the effects of singling out an individual on trust and trustworthiness. We find that (a) trustworthiness falls if there is a singled out subject; (b) non-singled out subjects discriminate against the singled out subject when they are not responsible of the distinct status of this person; (c) under a negative frame, the singled out subject returns significantly less; (d) under a positive frame, the singled out subject behaves bimodally, either selecting very low or very high return rates. Overall, singling out induces a negligible effect on trust but is potentially disruptive for trustworthiness. Copyright The Author(s) 2014

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-01080927.

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Date of creation: 2014
Publication status: Published in Social Choice and Welfare, Springer Verlag, 2014, 43 (3), pp. 703-729
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01080927
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01080927
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