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Asymmetric Monetary Policy in Australia

Author

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  • Shawn Chen-Yu Leu

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

  • Jeffrey Sheen

    (School of Economics and Political Science University of Sydney)

Abstract

We find evidence for asymmetric behaviour in Australian monetary policy. During 1984-1990, the Reserve Bank of Australia acted with considerable discretion yielding poor performance of an interest rate rule. However it behaved asymmetrically to inflation and the output gap in downturns and upturns. On embracing inflation targeting from 1991, it enhanced its credibility by anchoring inflation expectations. Not only did its actions become more predictable in 1991-2002, it responded asymmetrically only to output, switching to act more acutely in downturns. While its asymmetric behaviour could result from asymmetric preferences or non-linear aggregate supply, our results support the former explanation.

Suggested Citation

  • Shawn Chen-Yu Leu & Jeffrey Sheen, 2005. "Asymmetric Monetary Policy in Australia," Working Papers 2005.02, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:trb:wpaper:2005.02
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    Cited by:

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    2. Baxa, Jaromír & Horváth, Roman & VaÅ¡Ã­Ä ek, BoÅ™ek, 2014. "How Does Monetary Policy Change? Evidence On Inflation-Targeting Countries," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 593-630, April.
    3. Leu, Shawn Chen-Yu & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2011. "A small New Keynesian state space model of the Australian economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 672-684, January.
    4. Hoffmann, Andreas, 2009. "Fear of depression - Asymmetric monetary policy with respect to asset markets," MPRA Paper 17522, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Sergi Bruno S. & Hsing Yu, 2010. "Responses of Monetary Policy to Inflation, the Output Gap, and Real Exchange Rates: The Case of Australia, Canada, and New Zealand," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-11, May.
    6. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611.
    7. Thanaset Chevapatrakul & Juan Paez-Farrell, 2014. "Monetary Policy Reaction Functions in Small Open Economies: a Quantile Regression Approach," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(2), pages 237-256, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    interest rate rules; asymmetric preferences; non-linear Phillips curve; generalized method of moments; inflation targeting; credibility;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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