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The Matthew Effect for Cohorts of Economists

  • Richard S. J. Tol

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom
    Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands)

This paper applies the Ijiri-Simon test for systematic deviations from Gibrat’s Law to citation numbers of economists. It is found that often-cited researchers attract a new citation numbers that are disproportionate to the quality of their work. It is also found that this Matthew Effect is stronger for economists who started their academic career earlier.

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File URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/economics/documents/wps-55-2013.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Sussex in its series Working Paper Series with number 5513.

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Date of creation: Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:sus:susewp:5513
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  1. Jeong-Yoo Kim & Insik Min & Christian Zimmermann, 2007. "The Economics of Citation," Working papers 2007-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  2. Christian Seiler & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2011. "Ranking Economists on the Basis of Many Indicators: An Alternative Approach Using RePEc Data," CESifo Working Paper Series 3691, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Marshall Medoff, 2006. "Evidence of a Harvard and Chicago Matthew Effect," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 485-506.
  4. Christian Zimmermann, 2013. "Academic Rankings with RePEc," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(3), pages 249-280, December.
  5. Ralph Kenna & Bertrand Berche, 2011. "Normalization of peer-evaluation measures of group research quality across academic disciplines," Research Evaluation, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 107-116, June.
  6. De Vany, Arthur S. & Walls, W. David, 2004. "Motion picture profit, the stable Paretian hypothesis, and the curse of the superstar," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1035-1057, March.
  7. De Vany, Arthur S & Walls, W David, 1997. "The Market for Motion Pictures: Rank, Revenue, and Survival," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 783-97, October.
  8. David Maddison, 2004. "Increasing returns to information and the survival of broadway theatre productions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 639-643.
  9. Gonzalez-Brambila, Claudia & Veloso, Francisco M., 2007. "The determinants of research output and impact: A study of Mexican researchers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1035-1051, September.
  10. Ijiri, Yuji & Simon, Herbert A, 1974. "Interpretations of Departures from the Pareto Curve Firm-Size Distributions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 315-31, Part I, M.
  11. repec:dgr:uvatin:20000032 is not listed on IDEAS
  12. Thomas Krichel & Christian Zimmermann, 2005. "The Economics of Open Bibliographic Data Provision," Working papers 2005-01, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  13. Katz, J. Sylvan, 1999. "The self-similar science system1," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 501-517, June.
  14. Jean-Yves Lesueur, 2012. "La production scientifique des enseignants-chercheurs en économie. Quelques résultats économétriques issus du dispositif PES," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 63(4), pages 743-778.
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