IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

The Economics of Citation

Listed author(s):
  • Jeong-Yoo Kim

    (Kyung Hee University)

  • Insik Min

    (Kyung Hee University)

  • Christian Zimmermann

    (University of Connecticut)

This paper studies the citation decision of a scientific author. When an author can make his argument more persuasive by citing a related work, this is called the correlation effect. On the other hand, when an author cites someone else’s work, he gives the impression that he views the cited author as more competent than himself; this is called the signaling effect. These two effects are the main causes of citation bias. Using data from Research Papers in Economics or RePEc, a decentralized database of working papers, journal articles and professional books, we empirically show that a citation bias exists in this field. The empirical finding is obtained by controlling for many variables that affect citation patterns, such as network factors (co-authorship and an author’s affiliation) and language.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://keapaper.dothome.co.kr/RePEc/kea/keappr/KER-20110630-27-1-05.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Korean Economic Association in its journal Korean Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 27 (2011)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 93-114

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:kea:keappr:ker-20110630-27-1-05
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.kea.ne.kr/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Christian Zimmermann, 2013. "Academic Rankings with RePEc," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(3), pages 1-32, December.
  2. Jerry R. Green & Suzanne Scotchmer, 1995. "On the Division of Profit in Sequential Innovation," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 26(1), pages 20-33, Spring.
  3. Peter Senn, 2005. "Influence and the Referee Process," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 199-206, April.
  4. Stigler, George J & Friedland, Claire, 1975. "The Citation Practices of Doctorates in Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(3), pages 477-507, June.
  5. Bikhchandani, Sushil & Hirshleifer, David & Welch, Ivo, 1992. "A Theory of Fads, Fashion, Custom, and Cultural Change in Informational Cascades," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 992-1026, October.
  6. Abhijit V. Banerjee, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817.
  7. Jeong-Yoo Kim & Jinho Park, 2006. "On Prejudice," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 53(4), pages 505-522, 09.
  8. Wright, Malcolm & Armstrong, J. Scott, 2007. "Verification of Citations: Fawlty Towers of Knowledge?," MPRA Paper 4149, University Library of Munich, Germany.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:

  1. Papers using RePEc data

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kea:keappr:ker-20110630-27-1-05. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (KEA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.