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Author and article characteristics, journal quality and citation in economic research

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  • Shi Young Lee
  • Sanghack Lee
  • Sung Hee Jun

Abstract

Citation count serves as an indicator of quality of research in economics as well as in many other disciplines. The purpose of this article is to examine the effects of author and article characteristics on the citations in economics research. We investigate empirically the relationship between citations and author and article characteristics for different journal quality. We found that the same institution (affiliation) and the location of authors may affect the citation positively. Moreover, journal quality affects some of these variables differently. This article also provides rationales for these results.

Suggested Citation

  • Shi Young Lee & Sanghack Lee & Sung Hee Jun, 2010. "Author and article characteristics, journal quality and citation in economic research," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(17), pages 1697-1701.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:17:p:1697-1701
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850903120725
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeong-Yoo Kim & Insik Min & Christian Zimmermann, 2011. "The Economics of Citation," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 27, pages 93-114.
    2. Marshall Medoff, 2003. "Article placement and market signalling," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(8), pages 479-482.
    3. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "Favoritism versus Search for Good Papers: Empirical Evidence Regarding the Behavior of Journal Editors," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(1), pages 194-203, February.
    4. M. H. Medoff, 2003. "Article placement and market signalling," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(10), pages 601-604.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Iman Tahamtan & Askar Safipour Afshar & Khadijeh Ahamdzadeh, 2016. "Factors affecting number of citations: a comprehensive review of the literature," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(3), pages 1195-1225, June.
    2. David Michayluk & Ralf Zurbruegg, 2014. "Do lead articles signal higher quality in the digital age? Evidence from finance journals," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 98(2), pages 961-973, February.
    3. Jacob B. Slyder & Beth R. Stein & Brent S. Sams & David M. Walker & B. Jacob Beale & Jeffrey J. Feldhaus & Carolyn A. Copenheaver, 2011. "Citation pattern and lifespan: a comparison of discipline, institution, and individual," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 89(3), pages 955-966, December.
    4. Mingyang Wang & Zhenyu Wang & Guangsheng Chen, 2019. "Which can better predict the future success of articles? Bibliometric indices or alternative metrics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 119(3), pages 1575-1595, June.
    5. Nunkoo, Robin & Hall, C. Michael & Rughoobur-Seetah, Soujata & Teeroovengadum, Viraiyan, 2019. "Citation practices in tourism research: Toward a gender conscientious engagement," Annals of Tourism Research, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).

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