IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Increasing returns to information and the survival of broadway theatre productions


  • David Maddison


Many similarities exist between films and live theatre. Examination of the relationship between the log rank of a Broadway show and the number of performances reveals a significant departure from the Pareto distribution. This matches findings made for the corresponding relationship between log rank and film revenues. Using models of duration it is shown that a variety of characteristics, including genre, determine the number of performances on Broadway and whether the show is in receipt of prestigious awards. These findings are also similar to those for films except for the fact that as the duration of a run increases, the hazard rate declines. This is consistent with a situation when individuals base decisions on which show to attend partially on the observed length of a theatrical run. Over time theatrical productions are tending to survive longer in the market place and original shows tend to outlast revivals.

Suggested Citation

  • David Maddison, 2004. "Increasing returns to information and the survival of broadway theatre productions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 639-643.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:10:p:639-643 DOI: 10.1080/1350485042000227304

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jeffrey S. Simonoff, 2003. "An Empirical Study of Factors Relating to the Success of Broadway Shows," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76(1), pages 135-150, January.
    2. Ijiri, Yuji & Simon, Herbert A, 1974. "Interpretations of Departures from the Pareto Curve Firm-Size Distributions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 315-331, Part I, M.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrés González-Moralejo, S & Compés López, R, 2009. "Problemas contractuales y acuerdos de subcontratación: El caso de la logística frigorífica en la industria alimentaria valenciana/," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 27, pages 279(30á)-27, Abril.
    2. David Giles, 2007. "Increasing returns to information in the US popular music industry," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(5), pages 327-331.
    3. David Maddison, 2005. "Are There Too Many Revivals on Broadway? A Stochastic Dominance Approach," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(4), pages 325-334, November.
    4. Gaffeo, Edoardo & Scorcu, Antonello E. & Vici, Laura, 2008. "Demand distribution dynamics in creative industries: The market for books in Italy," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 257-268, September.
    5. Melissa Boyle & Lesley Chiou, 2009. "Broadway productions and the value of a Tony Award," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(1), pages 49-68, February.
    6. David Giles, 2007. "Survival of the hippest: life at the top of the hot 100," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(15), pages 1877-1887.
    7. W. D. Walls, 2009. "The Market for Motion Pictures in Thailand: Rank, Revenue, and Survival at the Box Office," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 8(2), pages 115-131, August.
    8. W. Walls, 2010. "Superstars and heavy tails in recorded entertainment: empirical analysis of the market for DVDs," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 34(4), pages 261-279, November.
    9. Sacit Hadi Akdede & Ayla Oğus, 2009. "Death As A Measure Of Duration Of Conflict," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(6), pages 465-476.
    10. Tol, Richard S.J., 2013. "The Matthew effect for cohorts of economists," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 522-527.
    11. Arthur Vany & W. Walls, 2007. "Estimating the Effects of Movie Piracy on Box-office Revenue," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 30(4), pages 291-301, June.
    12. Richard S.J. Tol, 2007. "The Matthew Effect Defined And Tested For The 100 Most Prolific Economists," Working Papers FNU-143, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Aug 2007.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:10:p:639-643. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.