IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Survival of the hippest: life at the top of the hot 100

  • David Giles

We analyse the survival characteristics of recordings that reached the number one spot on the US popular music charts over the period 1955 to 2003. Our results show that there has been a statistically significant change in the time spent at number one since 'album cuts' were included in the compilation of Billboard 's Hot 100. Survival time is significantly improved if the recording is by a female solo artist, or if it is an instrumental tune. We also find a significant 'Elvis effect'. 'I'll never be a saint, it's true. I'm too busy surviving!' (Madonna, 1994)

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840600707159
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2007)
Issue (Month): 15 ()
Pages: 1877-1887

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:15:p:1877-1887
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20

Order Information: Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAEC20

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Eric Strobl & Clive Tucker, 2000. "The Dynamics of Chart Success in the U.K. Pre-Recorded Popular Music Industry," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 113-134, May.
  2. Marie Connolly & Alan B. Krueger, 2005. "Rockonomics: The Economics of Popular Music," NBER Working Papers 11282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. David Maddison, 2004. "Increasing returns to information and the survival of broadway theatre productions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 639-643.
  4. Hamlen, William A, Jr, 1991. "Superstardom in Popular Music: Empirical Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 729-33, November.
  5. De Vany, Arthur S & Walls, W David, 1997. "The Market for Motion Pictures: Rank, Revenue, and Survival," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 783-97, October.
  6. Paul Meier & Theodore Karrison & Rick Chappell & Hui Xie, 2004. "The Price of Kaplan-Meier," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 99, pages 890-896, January.
  7. Andrew Burke, 1996. "The dynamics of product differentiation in the British record industry," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 145-164, June.
  8. W. David Walls, 1998. "Product survival at the cinema: evidence from Hong Kong," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 215-219.
  9. Jeffrey S. Simonoff, 2003. "An Empirical Study of Factors Relating to the Success of Broadway Shows," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76(1), pages 135-150, January.
  10. Chung, Kee H & Cox, Raymond A K, 1994. "A Stochastic Model of Superstardom: An Application of the Yule Distribution," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 771-75, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:15:p:1877-1887. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.