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Demand analysis of hit music in Japan

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  • Sumiko Asai

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Sumiko Asai, 2011. "Demand analysis of hit music in Japan," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(2), pages 101-117, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:35:y:2011:i:2:p:101-117
    DOI: 10.1007/s10824-011-9139-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kristien Werck & Bruno Heyndels, 2007. "Programmatic choices and the demand for theatre: the case of Flemish theatres," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 31(1), pages 25-41, March.
    2. Lonnie Stevans & David Sessions, 2005. "An Empirical Investigation Into the Effect of Music Downloading on the Consumer Expenditure of Recorded Music: A Time Series Approach," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 311-324, September.
    3. Hamlen, William A, Jr, 1991. "Superstardom in Popular Music: Empirical Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 729-733, November.
    4. Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2002. "Quality Judgements and Demand for French Public Theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(3), pages 185-202, August.
    5. Eric Strobl & Clive Tucker, 2000. "The Dynamics of Chart Success in the U.K. Pre-Recorded Popular Music Industry," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 24(2), pages 113-134, May.
    6. Zentner, Alejandro, 2006. "Measuring the Effect of File Sharing on Music Purchases," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(1), pages 63-90, April.
    7. Marta Zieba, 2009. "Full-income and price elasticities of demand for German public theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 33(2), pages 85-108, May.
    8. W. Walls, 2005. "Modeling Movie Success When ‘Nobody Knows Anything’: Conditional Stable-Distribution Analysis Of Film Returns," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(3), pages 177-190, August.
    9. Sudip Bhattacharjee & Ram D. Gopal & Kaveepan Lertwachara & James R. Marsden & Rahul Telang, 2007. "The Effect of Digital Sharing Technologies on Music Markets: A Survival Analysis of Albums on Ranking Charts," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 53(9), pages 1359-1374, September.
    10. Sumiko Asai, 2009. "Sales Patterns of Hit Music in Japan," Journal of Media Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 81-101.
    11. Abbe-Decarroux, Francois, 1994. "The perception of quality and the demand for services : Empirical application to the performing arts," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 99-107, January.
    12. Chung, Kee H & Cox, Raymond A K, 1994. "A Stochastic Model of Superstardom: An Application of the Yule Distribution," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 771-775, November.
    13. Felix Oberholzer-Gee & Koleman Strumpf, 2007. "The Effect of File Sharing on Record Sales: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 1-42.
    14. Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "The Economics of Superstars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 845-858, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:jculte:v:41:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10824-016-9272-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2014. "The effect of young children on their parents’ anime-viewing habits: evidence from Japanese microdata," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(4), pages 331-349, November.
    3. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Externality of young children on parents’ watching of anime: Evidence from Japanese micro data," MPRA Paper 46878, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand; Music CD; Price elasticity; Quality; L82;

    JEL classification:

    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media

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