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The Matthew Effect Defined And Tested For The 100 Most Prolific Economists

Author

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  • Richard S.J. Tol

    () (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin, Ireland)

Abstract

The Matthew effect has that often-cited papers/authors are cited more often. I use the statistical theory of the growth of firms to test whether the fame of papers and authors indeed exhibits increasing returns to scale, and confirm this hypothesis for the 100 most prolific economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard S.J. Tol, 2007. "The Matthew Effect Defined And Tested For The 100 Most Prolific Economists," Working Papers FNU-143, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Aug 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:143
    as

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    File URL: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/fileadmin/fnu-files/publication/working-papers/matthewwp.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. W. David Walls, 1997. "Increasing returns to information: evidence from the Hong Kong movie market," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(5), pages 287-290.
    2. David Maddison, 2004. "Increasing returns to information and the survival of broadway theatre productions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 639-643.
    3. Ijiri, Yuji & Simon, Herbert A, 1974. "Interpretations of Departures from the Pareto Curve Firm-Size Distributions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(2), pages 315-331, Part I, M.
    4. Chris Hand, 2001. "Increasing returns to information: further evidence from the UK film market," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(6), pages 419-421.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wolfram Elsner, 2013. "State and future of the ‘citadel’ and of the heterodoxies in economics: challenges and dangers, convergences and cooperation," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 10(3), pages 286—298-2, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Matthew effect; increasing returns to scale; citation analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General

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