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Social Norms and Pro-Environment Behaviours: Heterogeneous Response to Signals

Author

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  • Mikolaj Czajkowski

    () (University of Warsaw, Department of Economics, Dluga 44/50, 00-241 Warsaw, Poland)

  • Katarzyna Zagórska

    () (University of Warsaw, Department of Economics, Dluga 44/50, 00-241 Warsaw, Poland)

  • Nick Hanley

    () (University of Glasgow, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine)

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated an effect on pro-environment behaviours such as household recycling from communicating social norm information to respondents. In this paper, we extend this work by considering the effects of varying (i) the absolute size (strength) of the norm (ii) its geographic scope (iii) whether the norm is stated in relative terms. We also show how previous behaviours interact with social norm information. The context is a stated preference choice experiment on recycling behaviours by households in Poland. The main finding to emerge is that social norm effects on preferences for recycling seem to be very context-dependent. There is no evidence of generalizable effects which would be useful to policy designers.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikolaj Czajkowski & Katarzyna Zagórska & Nick Hanley, 2018. "Social Norms and Pro-Environment Behaviours: Heterogeneous Response to Signals," Discussion Papers in Environment and Development Economics 2018-02, University of St. Andrews, School of Geography and Sustainable Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:sss:wpaper:2018-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    recycling; social norms; stated preferences; choice modelling;

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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