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An Analysis of Employment Dynamics in Korea: The Role of Temporary Work and Self-Employment

Author

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  • Taehyun Ahn

    () (School of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul)

Abstract

In this study, I investigate dynamic employment choice among prime-age men and women using panel data from South Korea, with particular focus on temporary work and self-employment. Using a dynamic multinomial logit model with a factor-analytic random-effects specification, I find that temporary employment rarely serves as a stepping stone toward permanent employment. However, the estimates reveals some positive aspects of self-employment by indicating that individuals who were self-employed in the previous year are less likely than those who were in any other employment status to be nonemployed in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Taehyun Ahn, 2016. "An Analysis of Employment Dynamics in Korea: The Role of Temporary Work and Self-Employment," Working Papers 1606, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgo:wpaper:1606
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-Employment; Temporary Employment; Self-Employment; State Dependence;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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