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Temporary help agencies and occupational mobility

  • García-Pérez, J. Ignacio
  • Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando

This paper focuses upon the effect of Temporary Help Agencies (THAs) on occupational mobility through a comparison of the job-to-job upgrading chances of THA and non-THA workers. A screening approach to the role of these labor "brokers" suggests that agency workers can expect greater upgrading chances between two different occupations. Results obtained from a sample of Spanish workers show that working through these intermediaries allows workers in intermediate occupational levels to avoid occupational demotions more easily than non-THA ones. Moreover, THAs improve the probability for high-skilled workers of achieving a permanent contract. The empirical analysis demonstrates that the existence of self-selection is an important explanation for increased occupational mobility among THA workers in Spain.

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File URL: http://e-archivo.uc3m.es/bitstream/handle/10016/80/wb034110.pdf?sequence=1
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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa in its series DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB with number wb034110.

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Date of creation: Sep 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cte:wbrepe:wb034110
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.business.uc3m.es/es/index

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  1. Lewis Segal & Daniel Sullivan, 1996. "The growth of temporary services work," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues WP-96-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  2. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
  3. Katharine G. Abraham, 1988. "Flexible Staffing Arrangements and Employers' Short-Term Adjustment Strategies," NBER Working Papers 2617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando & García-Pérez, J. Ignacio, 2003. "The nineties in Spain: too much flexibility in the youth labour market?," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb030302, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
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