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International Transmission of the Business Cycle and Environmental Policy

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Abstract

This paper presents a baseline dynamic general-equilibrium model of environmental policy for a two-country economy and studies the international transmission of several asymmetric shocks considering three different economy-wide greenhouse gases (GHG) emission regulations: (i) national cap-and-trade, (ii) carbon tax, and (iii) international cap-and-trade system allowing for cross-border allocation of emission permits. We find that international spillovers of shocks originated in one country are strongly influenced by the environmental regime put in place. We show that, while a national cap-and-trade system diminishes the international spillovers by dampening the response of the country hit by shocks, the cross-border reaction to supply-side shocks is found to be magnified under an international cap-and-trade system, while demand shocks are more intensively transmitted under a carbon tax. The pattern of trade and the underlying monetary regime in uence the cross-border transmission channels interacting with the environmental policy adopted.

Suggested Citation

  • Barbara Annicchiarico & Francesca Diluiso, 2017. "International Transmission of the Business Cycle and Environmental Policy," CEIS Research Paper 423, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 19 Dec 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:423
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Open Economy Macroeconomics; GHG Emission Control; Macroeconomic Dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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