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Civil War Exposure And School Enrolment:Evidence From The Mozambican Civil War

  • Domingues, Patrick

    (Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne, University of Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne)

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    Using a new database on the Mozambican Civil War, this paper utilises the heterogeneity of the duration of conflict across the Mozambican provinces to assess its impact on school enrolment. The results indicate that only conflict exposure during the first seven years of life reduced the probability of school enrolment; no effect was found for exposure after this age or for in-utero exposure. Furthermore, the results show that this negative effect is specific to girls and that these results are linked with choices made by households during the war period.

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    Paper provided by Network of European Peace Scientists in its series NEPS Working Papers with number 1/2011.

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    Length: 48 pages
    Date of creation: 16 Dec 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ris:nepswp:2011_001
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    9. Corno, Lucia & de Walque, Damien, 2007. "The determinants of HIV infection and related sexual behaviors : evidence from Lesotho," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4421, The World Bank.
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    13. Chen, Yuyu & Li, Hongbin, 2009. "Mother's education and child health: Is there a nurturing effect?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 413-426, March.
    14. Akresh, Richard & de Walque, Damien, 2008. "Armed conflict and schooling : evidence from the 1994 Rwandan genocide," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4606, The World Bank.
    15. Diane J. Macunovich, 2000. "Relative Cohort Size: Source of a Unifying Theory of Global Fertility Transition?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(2), pages 235-261.
    16. Damien Walque, 2005. "Selective Mortality During the Khmer Rouge Period in Cambodia," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(2), pages 351-368.
    17. Christine Valente, 2011. "What Did the Maoists Ever Do for Us? Education and Marriage of Women Exposed to Civil Conflict in Nepal," HiCN Working Papers 105, Households in Conflict Network.
    18. Eik Leong Swee, 2009. "On War and Schooling Attainment: The Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina," HiCN Working Papers 57, Households in Conflict Network.
    19. Christopher Blattman & Jeannie Annan, 2010. "The Consequences of Child Soldiering," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(4), pages 882-898, November.
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