IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rim/rimwps/16-30.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Climbing the property ladder: An analysis of market integration in London property prices

Author

Listed:
  • Mark J. Holmes

    () (Department of Economics, Waikato University, New Zealand)

  • Jesús Otero

    () (Facultad de Economía, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia)

  • Theodore Panagiotidis

    () (Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, Greece; The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, Italy)

Abstract

We investigate the long-run convergence of house prices across the London boroughs based on a pairwise unit root probabilistic testing procedure. In sharp contrast to the earlier literature, we employ a dataset that distinguishes between four different types of property in each borough. Using a quarterly dataset that spans from 1995 to 2014, we find evidence in favour of long-run convergence thereby suggesting that the great majority of London borough house prices are driven by a single common stochastic trend. In a further contribution, we offer new insights through analysing the determinants of long-run convergence, by considering the role of geographic proximity, type of accommodation, and amenities (quality of life).

Suggested Citation

  • Mark J. Holmes & Jesús Otero & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2016. "Climbing the property ladder: An analysis of market integration in London property prices," Working Paper series 16-30, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:16-30
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.rcea.org/RePEc/pdf/wp16-30.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hashem Pesaran, M., 2007. "A pair-wise approach to testing for output and growth convergence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 312-355, May.
    2. Andrew Abbott & Glauco De Vita, 2012. "Pairwise Convergence of District-level House Prices in London," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(4), pages 721-740, March.
    3. Jesús Otero & Jeremy Smith, 2012. "Response surface models for the Leybourne unit root tests and lag order dependence," Computational Statistics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 473-486, September.
    4. Fack, Gabrielle & Grenet, Julien, 2010. "When do better schools raise housing prices? Evidence from Paris public and private schools," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 59-77, February.
    5. Mark J. Holmes & Arthur Grimes, 2008. "Is There Long-run Convergence among Regional House Prices in the UK?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 45(8), pages 1531-1544, July.
    6. Stephan Huber & Christoph Rust, 2016. "Calculate travel time and distance with OpenStreetMap data using the Open Source Routing Machine (OSRM)," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 16(2), pages 416-423, June.
    7. Otero, Jesus & Smith, Jeremy, 2000. "Testing for cointegration: power versus frequency of observation -- further Monte Carlo results," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 5-9, April.
    8. Leybourne, S J, 1995. "Testing for Unit Roots Using Forward and Reverse Dickey-Fuller Regressions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(4), pages 559-571, November.
    9. Edward L. Glaeser & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2009. "The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(4), pages 983-1028, December.
    10. Steve Gibbons, 2004. "The Costs of Urban Property Crime," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages 441-463, November.
    11. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Lai, Kon S, 1995. "Lag Order and Critical Values of the Augmented Dickey-Fuller Test," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(3), pages 277-280, July.
    12. Myriam Nourry, 2009. "Re-Examining the Empirical Evidence for Stochastic Convergence of Two Air Pollutants with a Pair-Wise Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 44(4), pages 555-570, December.
    13. Mark J. Holmes & Jesús Otero & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2017. "A Pair-wise Analysis of Intra-city Price Convergence Within the Paris Housing Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 54(1), pages 1-16, January.
    14. Carlino, Gerald A. & Mills, Leonard, 1996. "Testing neoclassical convergence in regional incomes and earnings," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 565-590, December.
    15. Holmes, Mark J. & Otero, Jesús & Panagiotidis, Theodore, 2011. "Investigating regional house price convergence in the United States: Evidence from a pair-wise approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2369-2376.
    16. Leung, Charles, 2004. "Macroeconomics and housing: a review of the literature," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 249-267, December.
    17. Holly, Sean & Hashem Pesaran, M. & Yamagata, Takashi, 2011. "The spatial and temporal diffusion of house prices in the UK," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 2-23, January.
    18. Paul Cheshire & Stephen Sheppard, 2004. "Capitalising the Value of Free Schools: The Impact of Supply Characteristics and Uncertainty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages 397-424, November.
    19. Michael J. Ball, 1973. "Recent Empirical Work on the Determinants of Relative House Prices," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 10(2), pages 213-233, June.
    20. Baltagi, Badi H. & Bresson, Georges, 2011. "Maximum likelihood estimation and Lagrange multiplier tests for panel seemingly unrelated regressions with spatial lag and spatial errors: An application to hedonic housing prices in Paris," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 24-42, January.
    21. Stephen Gibbons & Stephen Machin, 2006. "Paying for Primary Schools: Admission Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 77-92, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pair-wise; house prices; cointegration; convergence;

    JEL classification:

    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • R3 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:16-30. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marco Savioli). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rcfeait.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.