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Terminating Links between Emission Trading Programs

Author

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  • Pizer, William A.
  • Yates, Andrew J.

Abstract

Links between emission trading programs are not immutable, as highlighted by New Jersey's exit from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. This raises the question of what to do with existing permits that are banked for future use--choices that have consequences for market behavior in advance of, or upon speculation about, delinking. We consider two delinking policies. One differentiates banked permits by origin, the other treats banked permits the same. We describe the price behavior and relative cost-effectiveness of each policy. Treating permits differently generally leads to higher costs, and may lead to price divergence, even with only speculation about delinking.

Suggested Citation

  • Pizer, William A. & Yates, Andrew J., 2014. "Terminating Links between Emission Trading Programs," Discussion Papers dp-14-28, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-14-28
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-14-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harstad, Bård & Eskeland, Gunnar S., 2010. "Trading for the future: Signaling in permit markets," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 749-760, October.
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    3. Matthew Ranson & Robert N. Stavins, 2016. "Linkage of greenhouse gas emissions trading systems: learning from experience," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 284-300, April.
    4. Frank Jotzo & Regina Betz, 2009. "Australia's emissions trading scheme: opportunities and obstacles for linking," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 402-414, July.
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    8. Cronshaw, Mark B & Brown-Kruse, Jamie, 1996. "Regulated Firms in Pollution Permit Markets with Banking," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 179-189, March.
    9. Michael Mehling & Erik Haites, 2009. "Mechanisms for linking emissions trading schemes," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 169-184, January.
    10. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Jeffrey J. Schott, 2005. "NAFTA Revisited: Achievements and Challenges," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 332.
    11. Erik Haites & Michael Mehling, 2009. "Linking existing and proposed GHG emissions trading schemes in North America," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 373-388, July.
    12. Erik Haites, 2009. "Linking emissions trading schemes for international aviation and shipping emissions," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 415-430, July.
    13. Rubin, Jonathan D., 1996. "A Model of Intertemporal Emission Trading, Banking, and Borrowing," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 269-286, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bodansky, Daniel M. & Hoedl, Seth A. & Metcalf, Gilbert E. & Stavins, Robert N., "undated". "Facilitating Linkage of Heterogeneous Regional, National, and Sub-National Climate Policies Through a Future International Agreement," Climate Change and Sustainable Development 202114, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    2. Richard S.J. Tol, 2017. "Leaving an emissions trading scheme – insights from the United Kingdom," Working Paper Series 1017, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    3. repec:spr:ieaple:v:17:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10784-017-9370-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Peter Zaman & Adam Hedley, 2016. "Networked Carbon Markets," World Bank Other Operational Studies 26430, The World Bank.
    5. repec:spr:climat:v:144:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10584-015-1506-z is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Mehling, Michael A. & Metcalf, Gilbert E. & Stavins, Robert N., 2017. "Linking Heterogeneous Climate Policies (Consistent with the Paris Agreement)," Working Paper Series rwp17-042, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    7. repec:oup:renvpo:v:12:y:2018:i:1:p:183-189. is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Baran Doda, Simon Quemin, Luca Taschini, 2017. "A theory of gains from trade in multilaterally linked ETSs," GRI Working Papers 275, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    9. Koch, Nicolas & Grosjean, Godefroy & Fuss, Sabine & Edenhofer, Ottmar, 2016. "Politics matters: Regulatory events as catalysts for price formation under cap-and-trade," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 121-139.
    10. repec:ucp:jaerec:doi:10.1086/691975 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Baran Doda & Luca Taschini, 2017. "Carbon Dating: When Is It Beneficial to Link ETSs?," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 701-730.
    12. Baran Doda & Simon Quemin, 2018. "Linking Permit Markets Multilaterally," Working Papers 1804, Chaire Economie du climat.
    13. Simon Quemin & Christian de Perthuis, 2017. "Transitional restricted linkage between Emissions Trading Schemes," Working Papers 1701, Chaire Economie du climat.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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