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Linking Heterogeneous Climate Policies (Consistent with the Paris Agreement)

Author

Listed:
  • Mehling, Michael A.

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

  • Metcalf, Gilbert E.

    (Tufts University)

  • Stavins, Robert N.

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

The Paris Agreement has achieved one of two key necessary conditions for ultimate success – a broad base of participation among the countries of the world. But another key necessary condition has yet to be achieved – adequate collective ambition of the individual nationally determined contributions. How can the climate negotiators provide a structure that will include incentives to increase ambition over time? An important part of the answer can be international linkage of regional, national, and sub-national policies, that is, formal recognition of emission reductions undertaken in another jurisdiction for the purpose of meeting a Party’s own mitigation objectives. A central challenge is how to facilitate such linkage in the context of the very great heterogeneity that characterizes climate policies along five dimensions – type of policy instrument; level of government jurisdiction; status of that jurisdiction under the Paris Agreement; nature of the policy instrument’s target; and the nature along several dimensions of each Party’s Nationally Determined Contribution. We consider such heterogeneity among policies, and identify which linkages of various combinations of characteristics are feasible; of these, which are most promising; and what accounting mechanisms would make the operation of respective linkages consistent with the Paris Agreement.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehling, Michael A. & Metcalf, Gilbert E. & Stavins, Robert N., 2017. "Linking Heterogeneous Climate Policies (Consistent with the Paris Agreement)," Working Paper Series rwp17-042, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp17-042
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Mehling & Erik Haites, 2009. "Mechanisms for linking emissions trading schemes," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 169-184, January.
    2. Richard Schmalensee & Robert N. Stavins, 2017. "Lessons Learned from Three Decades of Experience with Cap and Trade," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(1), pages 59-79.
    3. Matthew Ranson & Robert N. Stavins, 2012. "Post-Durban Climate Policy Architecture Based on Linkage of Cap-and-Trade Systems," NBER Working Papers 18140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    10. Matthew Ranson & Robert N. Stavins, 2016. "Linkage of greenhouse gas emissions trading systems: learning from experience," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 284-300, April.
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    1. repec:eee:rensus:v:101:y:2019:i:c:p:453-460 is not listed on IDEAS
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    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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