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Facilitating Linkage of Heterogeneous Regional, National, and Sub-national Climate Policies through a Future International Agreement

Author

Listed:
  • Bodansky, Daniel M.

    (AZ State University)

  • Hoedl, Seth

    (Harvard University)

  • Metcalf, Gilbert

    (Tufts University)

  • Stavins, Robert

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

Negotiations pursuant to the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action appear likely to lead to a 2015 Paris agreement that embodies a hybrid climate policy architecture, combining top-down elements, such as for monitoring, reporting, and verification, with bottom-up elements, including "nationally determined contributions" from each participating country, detailing what it intends to do to reduce emissions, based on its national circumstances. For such a system to be cost-effective--and thus more likely to achieve significant global emissions reductions--a key feature will be linkages among regional, national, and sub-national climate policies. By linkage, we mean a formal recognition by a greenhouse gas mitigation program in one jurisdiction (a regional, national, or sub-national government) of emission reductions undertaken in another jurisdiction for purposes of complying with the first jurisdiction's mitigation program. We examine how a future international policy architecture could help facilitate the growth and operation of a robust system of international linkages of regional, national, and sub-national policies. Several design elements merit serious consideration for inclusion in the Paris agreement, either directly or by establishing a process for subsequent international elaboration. At the same time, including detailed linkage rules in the core agreement is not desirable because this could make it difficult for rules to evolve in light of experience.

Suggested Citation

  • Bodansky, Daniel M. & Hoedl, Seth & Metcalf, Gilbert & Stavins, Robert, 2015. "Facilitating Linkage of Heterogeneous Regional, National, and Sub-national Climate Policies through a Future International Agreement," Working Paper Series rwp15-003, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp15-003
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    1. repec:eee:resene:v:49:y:2017:i:c:p:33-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:ucp:jaerec:doi:10.1086/691975 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Baran Doda & Luca Taschini, 2017. "Carbon Dating: When Is It Beneficial to Link ETSs?," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 701-730.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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