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Carbon Dating: When Is It Beneficial to Link ETSs?

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  • Baran Doda
  • Luca Taschini

Abstract

We propose a theory of the economic advantage (EA) of regulating carbon emissions by linking two emissions trading systems versus operating them under autarky. Linking implies that permits issued in one system can be traded internationally for use in the other. We show how the nature of uncertainty, market sizes, and sunk costs of linking determine EA. Even when sunk costs are small so EA>0, autarky can be preferable to one partner, depending on jurisdiction characteristics. Moreover, one partner's permit price volatility under linking may increase without making linking the less preferred option. An empirical application calibrates jurisdiction characteristics to demonstrate the economic significance of our results, which can make linking partner match crucial for the effectiveness and success of the Paris Agreement.

Suggested Citation

  • Baran Doda & Luca Taschini, 2017. "Carbon Dating: When Is It Beneficial to Link ETSs?," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 701-730.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jaerec:doi:10.1086/691975
    DOI: 10.1086/691975
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    Cited by:

    1. Borghesi, Simone & Flori, Andrea, 2018. "EU ETS facets in the net: Structure and evolution of the EU ETS network," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 602-635.
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    3. Maria Arvaniti & Wolfgang Habla, 2020. "The Political Economy of Negotiating International Carbon Markets," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 20/335, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    4. Holtsmark, Katinka & Midttømme, Kristoffer, 2015. "The Dynamics of Linking Permit Markets," Memorandum 02/2015, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    5. Mario A. Fernandez & Adam J. Daigneault, 2018. "Money Does Grow On Trees: Impacts Of The Paris Agreement On The New Zealand Economy," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 9(03), pages 1-23, August.
    6. Lambert Schneider & Michael Lazarus & Carrie Lee & Harro van Asselt, 2017. "Restricted linking of emissions trading systems: options, benefits, and challenges," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 883-898, December.
    7. Baran Doda, Simon Quemin, Luca Taschini, 2017. "A theory of gains from trade in multilaterally linked ETSs," GRI Working Papers 275, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    8. Taran Fæhn & Hidemichi Yonezawa, 2021. "Emission targets and coalition options for a small, ambitious country. An analysis of welfare costs and distributional impacts for Norway," Discussion Papers 956, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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