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International emissions trading with endogenous allowance choices

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  • Helm, Carsten

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  • Helm, Carsten, 2003. "International emissions trading with endogenous allowance choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(12), pages 2737-2747, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:87:y:2003:i:12:p:2737-2747
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    1. Krishna, Kala & Tan, Ling Hui, 1999. "Transferable Licenses versus Nontransferable Licenses: What Is the Difference?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 40(3), pages 785-800, August.
    2. Nordhaus, William D & Yang, Zili, 1996. "A Regional Dynamic General-Equilibrium Model of Alternative Climate-Change Strategies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 741-765, September.
    3. Carraro, Carlo & Siniscalco, Domenico, 1993. "Strategies for the international protection of the environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 309-328, October.
    4. Chichilnisky, Graciela & Heal, Geoffrey, 1995. "Markets with tradable CO2 emission quotas: principles and practice," MPRA Paper 8486, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Peter Bohm, 1992. "Distributional Implications of Allowing International Trade in CO, Emission Quotas," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 107-114, January.
    6. Barrett, Scott, 1994. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 878-894, Supplemen.
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