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Banks Interconnectivity and Leverage

Author

Listed:
  • Vincenzo Quadrini

    (USC)

  • Laura Moretti

    (Central Bank of Ireland)

  • Alessandro Barattieri

    (Collegio Carlo Alberto and ESG UQAM)

Abstract

In the period that preceded the 2008 crisis, US financial intermediaries have become more leveraged (measured as the ratio of assets over equity) and interconnected (measured as the share of liabilities held by other financial intermediaries). This upward trend in leverage and interconnectivity sharply reversed after the crisis. To understand this dynamic pattern we develop a model where banks make risky investments in the non-financial sector and sell part of their investments to other financial institutions (diversification). The model predicts a positive correlation between leverage and interconnectivity which we explore empirically using balance sheet data for over 14,000 financial intermediaries in 32 OECD countries. We enrich the theoretical model by allowing for Bayesian learning about the likelihood of a bank crisis (aggregate risk) and show that the model can capture the dynamics of leverage and interconnectivity observed in the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincenzo Quadrini & Laura Moretti & Alessandro Barattieri, 2017. "Banks Interconnectivity and Leverage," 2017 Meeting Papers 504, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed017:504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kalemli-Ozcan, Sebnem & Sorensen, Bent & Yesiltas, Sevcan, 2012. "Leverage across firms, banks, and countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 284-298.
    2. Franziska Bremus & Claudia Buch & Katheryn Russ & Monika Schnitzer, 2013. "Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence of Granularity," NBER Working Papers 19093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Peltonen, Tuomas & Sarlin, Peter & Rancan, Michela, 2015. "Interconnectedness of the banking sector as a vulnerability to crises," Working Paper Series 1866, European Central Bank.
    4. Freixas, Xavier & Parigi, Bruno M & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 2000. "Systemic Risk, Interbank Relations, and Liquidity Provision by the Central Bank," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 611-638, August.
    5. Rocco Huang & Lev Ratnovski, 2009. "Why Are Canadian Banks More Resilient?," IMF Working Papers 09/152, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Billio, Monica & Getmansky, Mila & Lo, Andrew W. & Pelizzon, Loriana, 2012. "Econometric measures of connectedness and systemic risk in the finance and insurance sectors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 535-559.
    7. Meraj Allahrakha & Paul Glasserman & Peyton Young, 2015. "Systemic Importance Indicators for 33 U.S. Bank Holding Companies: An Overview of Recent Data," Briefs 15-01, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.
    8. Eisert, Tim & Eufinger, Christian, 2013. "Interbank network and bank bailouts: Insurance mechanism for non-insured creditors?," SAFE Working Paper Series 10, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    9. Alessandro Barattieri & Maya Eden & Dalibor Stevanovic, 2015. "Financial Sector Interconnectedness and Monetary Policy Transmission," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 436, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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