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Childcare and commitment within households

Author

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  • Paula Gobbi

    (Université catholique de Louvain)

Abstract

Parental time with children increases with the education of both the mother and the father. As the education of parents increases, the gap between childcare supplied by mothers relative to that supplied by fathers decreases. A two steps semi-cooperative marital decision model is proposed to explain these two facts. First, parents collectively choose the amount of labor to supply and, in a second step, each of them chooses the amount of childcare as the outcome of a Cournot game. This framework gives rise to indeterminacy of the equilibrium and four selection criteria are proposed: one of a machist society, one of a feminist society, one of a random equilibrium and a last one that estimates the degree of social gender bias towards men. The semi-cooperative theoretical frameworks with the random selection criterion and the criterion that estimates the bias towards men provide the best match with the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Gobbi, 2014. "Childcare and commitment within households," 2014 Meeting Papers 633, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:633
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_633.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David de la Croix & Clara Delavallade, 2015. "Religions, Fertility and Growth in South-East Asia," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2015002, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Paula E. Gobbi & Juliane Parys & Gregor Schwerhoff, 2018. "Intra-household allocation of parental leave," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 51(1), pages 236-274, February.
    3. repec:kap:reveho:v:16:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11150-016-9336-y is not listed on IDEAS
    4. David de la Croix & Faustine Perrin, 2016. "French Fertility and Education Transition: Rational Choice vs. Cultural Diffusion," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    5. David de la Croix & Thomas Baudin, 2015. "La croissance économique," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2015021, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

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