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The Effects of Firm Size on Job Quality: A Comparative Study for Britain and France

Author

Listed:
  • Alex Bryson

    () (University College London, National Institute of Social and Economic Research and Institute for the Study of Labor)

  • Christine Erhel

    (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne, CEET)

  • Zinaïda Salibekyan

    (CNAM, LIRSA, CEET, LEST)

Abstract

Using linked employer–employee data from two comparable surveys this article examines the links between non-pecuniary job quality and workplace characteristics in Britain and France – countries with very different employment regimes. The results show that job quality is better in Britain than it is in France, despite its minimalist regulatory regime. The difference is apparent for all dimensions of job quality (skill development, training participation, job autonomy, job insecurity, work-life balance and relations between employers and employees), except skills' match to a job. Firm size is negatively associated with non-pecuniary job quality in both countries but in France the association is confined to only the largest firms. Internal Labour Markets (ILMs) are associated with higher job quality in France, but not in Britain.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & Christine Erhel & Zinaïda Salibekyan, 2017. "The Effects of Firm Size on Job Quality: A Comparative Study for Britain and France," DoQSS Working Papers 17-08, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1708
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kathleen Thelen & Ikuo Kume, 1999. "The Effects of Globalization on Labor Revisited: Lessons from Germany and Japan," Politics & Society, , vol. 27(4), pages 477-505, December.
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    3. Culpepper, Pepper D, 1999. "The Future of the High-Skill Equilibrium in Germany," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 43-59, Spring.
    4. Andrew J. Oswald & Eugenio Proto & Daniel Sgroi, 2015. "Happiness and Productivity," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(4), pages 789-822.
    5. David Holman, 2013. "An explanation of cross-national variation in call centre job quality using institutional theory," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 27(1), pages 21-38, February.
    6. Greenhalgh, Christine, 1999. "Adult Vocational Training and Government Policy in France and Britain," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 97-113, Spring.
    7. Michael J. Piore, 1978. "Dualism in the Labor Market : A Response to Uncertainty and Flux. The Case of France," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 29(1), pages 26-48.
    8. Eyraud, Francois & Marsden, David & Silvestre, Jean-Jacques, 1990. "Occupational and internal labour markets in Britain and France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 21305, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job quality; Firm size; Internal labour market; Linked employer-employee data; Britain; France; Comparative;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions

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