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Aerial Bombardment and Educational Attainment

Author

Listed:
  • Le, Kien
  • Nguyen, My

Abstract

This paper provides evidence that the Allied bombing of Vietnam, the longest and heaviest aerial bombardment in the history, imposed detrimental effects on educational attainment of school-age individuals. By exploiting the plausibly exogenous district-by-cohort variation in bomb destruction under a difference-in-differences framework, we find that an increase in bomb intensity leads to significantly fewer educational years completed by school-age children exposed to the bombardment. A series of robustness checks, falsification tests, and the instrumental-variable strategy further support our results. The findings underline the importance of policies targeting children after wartime.

Suggested Citation

  • Le, Kien & Nguyen, My, 2018. "Aerial Bombardment and Educational Attainment," MPRA Paper 90766, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:90766
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/90766/1/MPRA_paper_90766.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vietnam War; large-scale destruction; aerial bombardment; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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