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A Causal Exploration of Conflict Events and Commodity Prices of Sudan

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Junyi
  • Kibriya, Shahriar
  • Bessler, David
  • Price, Edwin

Abstract

Though recent literature uncovers linkages between commodity prices and conflict, the causal direction of the relationship remains ambiguous. We attempt to contribute in this strand of research by studying the dynamic relationship of commodity prices and the onsets of conflict events in Sudan. Using monthly data ranging from January 2001 through December 2012, we identify a structural breakpoint in the multivariate time series model of prices of the three staple foods (sorghum, millet, and wheat) and conflict measure (number of conflict events) in September of 2011. Applying Structure Vector Autoregression (SVAR) and Linear Non-Gaussian Acyclic Model (LiNGAM), we find that wheat price is a cause of conflict events in Sudan. We find no feedback from conflict to commodity prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Junyi & Kibriya, Shahriar & Bessler, David & Price, Edwin, 2015. "A Causal Exploration of Conflict Events and Commodity Prices of Sudan," MPRA Paper 62461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:62461
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/62461/1/MPRA_paper_62461.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anton-Erxleben, Katharina & Kibriya, Shahriar & Zhang, Yu, 2016. "Bullying as the main driver of low performance in schools: Evidence from Botswana, Ghana, and South Africa," MPRA Paper 75555, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commodity Prices; Conflict; Sudan;

    JEL classification:

    • C54 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Quantitative Policy Modeling
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • Q02 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Commodity Market

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