IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diweos/diweos57.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Effects of Terrorism and War on the Oil and Prices Stock Indices Relationship

Author

Listed:
  • Christos Kollias
  • Catherine Kyrtsou
  • Stephanos Papadamou

Abstract

This paper, investigates the effect war and terrorism, have on the covariance between oil prices and the indices of four major stock markets - the American S&P500 and the European DAX, CAC40 and FTSE100 - using nonlinear BEKK-GARCH type models. Findings reported herein indicate that the covariance between stock and oil returns is affected by war. A tentative explanation is that the two wars examined here, predispose investors and market agents for more profound and longer lasting effects. On the other hand, in the case of terrorist incidents that, vis-à-vis war, are of a more transitory nature and one-off security shocks, only the co-movement between CAC40, DAX and oil returns is affected. No significant impact for the same terrorist events is observed in the relationship between the S&P500, FTSE100 and oil returns. This difference in the reaction may tentatively be interpreted as indicating that the latter markets are more efficient in absorbing the impact of terrorist attacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Christos Kollias & Catherine Kyrtsou & Stephanos Papadamou, 2011. "The Effects of Terrorism and War on the Oil and Prices Stock Indices Relationship," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 57, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diweos:diweos57
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.391361.de/diw_econsec0057.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jussi Nikkinen & Sami Vähämaa, 2010. "Terrorism and Stock Market Sentiment," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 263-275, May.
    2. Park, Jungwook & Ratti, Ronald A., 2008. "Oil price shocks and stock markets in the U.S. and 13 European countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2587-2608, September.
    3. Miller, J. Isaac & Ratti, Ronald A., 2009. "Crude oil and stock markets: Stability, instability, and bubbles," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 559-568, July.
    4. Eldor, Rafi & Melnick, Rafi, 2004. "Financial markets and terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 367-386, June.
    5. Papapetrou, Evangelia, 2001. "Oil price shocks, stock market, economic activity and employment in Greece," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 511-532, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Christos Kollias & Stephanos Papadamou & Costas Siriopoulos, 2012. "Terrorism Induced Cross-Market Transmission of Shocks: A Case Study Using Intraday Data," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 66, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Chen, Junyi & Kibriya, Shahriar & Bessler, David A. & Price, Edwin C., 2015. "A Causal Exploration of Food Price Shocks and Conflict in Sudan," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 202612, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Rania Jammazi & Duc Khuong Nguyen, 2015. "Responses of international stock markets to oil price surges: a regime-switching perspective," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(41), pages 4408-4422, September.
    4. Nicholas Apergis & Matteo Bonato & Rangan Gupta & Clement Kyei, 2016. "Does Geopolitical Risks Predict Stock Returns and Volatility of Leading Defense Companies? Evidence from a Nonparametric Approach," Working Papers 201671, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-085 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Elie Bouri & Riza Demirer & Rangan Gupta & Hardik A. Marfatia, 2017. "Geopolitical Risks and Movements in Islamic Bond and Equity Markets: A Note," Working Papers 201743, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    7. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-080 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Chen, Junyi & Kibriya, Shahriar & Bessler, David & Price, Edwin, 2015. "A Causal Exploration of Conflict Events and Commodity Prices of Sudan," MPRA Paper 62461, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    war; terrorism; crude oil; stock market returns; co-movement;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:diw:diweos:diweos57. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bibliothek). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/diwbede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.