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Simple Rules For Climate Policy And Integrated Assessment

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  • Rick Van der Ploeg
  • Armon Rezai

Abstract

A simple integrated assessment framework that gives rules for the optimal carbon price, transition to the carbon-free era and stranded carbon assets is presented, which highlights the ethical, economic, geophysical and political drivers of optimal climate policy. For the ethics we discuss the role of intergenerational inequality aversion and the discount rate, where we show the importance of lower discount rates for appraisal of longer run benefit and of policy makers using lower discount rates than private agents. The economics depends on the costs and rates of technical progress in production of fossil fuel, its substitute renewable energies and sequestration. The geophysics depends on the permanent and transient components of atmospheric carbon and the relatively fast temperature response, and we allow for positive feedbacks. The politics stems from international free-rider problems in absence of a global climate deal. We show how results change if different assumptions are made about each of thedrivers of climate policy. Our main objective is to offer an easy back-on-the-envelope analysis, which can be used for teaching and communication with policy makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Rick Van der Ploeg & Armon Rezai, 2018. "Simple Rules For Climate Policy And Integrated Assessment," OxCarre Working Papers 213, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:213
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    Cited by:

    1. Yannis Dafermos & Maria Nikolaidi, 2021. "How can green differentiated capital requirements affect climate risks? A dynamic macrofinancial analysis," Working Papers PKWP2105, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
    2. Cees A. Withagen, 2018. "The Social Cost of Carbon and the Ramsey Rule," CESifo Working Paper Series 7359, CESifo.
    3. Hambel, Christoph & Kraft, Holger & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2020. "Asset diversification versus climate action," CEPR Discussion Papers 14863, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Rick Van der Ploeg & Christoph Hambel & Holger Kraft, 2020. "Asset Pricing and Decarbonization: Diversification versus Climate Action," Economics Series Working Papers 901, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Richard S.J. Tol, 2021. "Estimates of the social cost of carbon have not changed over time," Working Paper Series 0821, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    simple rules; climate policy; ethics; economics; geophysics; politics; discounting with declining discount rates; positive feedback; free riding;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)

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