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From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation with Pollution

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  • Takumi Motoyama

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

This study examines the process of economic development in an overlapping generations model where higher physical capital involves pollution and deteriorates the productivity of education. In this setting, households may not invest into education and multiple steady states of the physical/human capital ratio can arise, leading long-run production with low initial endowment (physical capital) to be higher than that with high initial endowment. This occurs because, owing to the low productivity of education caused by pollution, only physical capital accumulation occurs with high initial endowment, while physical and human capital accumulation occur with low initial endowment. This result is consistent with the resource curse. We also show that higher abatement technology can solve the resource curse problem since it helps households redirect physical capital accumulation toward human capital accumulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Takumi Motoyama, 2016. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation with Pollution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 16-03, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1603
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1603.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2004. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation: Inequality and the Process of Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(4), pages 1001-1026.
    2. John, A & Pecchenino, R, 1994. "An Overlapping Generations Model of Growth and the Environment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1393-1410, November.
    3. Ikefuji, Masako & Horii, Ryo, 2012. "Natural disasters in a two-sector model of endogenous growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 784-796.
    4. Currie, Janet & Neidell, Matthew & Schmieder, Johannes F., 2009. "Air pollution and infant health: Lessons from New Jersey," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 688-703, May.
    5. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
    6. Joshua Graff Zivin & Matthew Neidell, 2012. "The Impact of Pollution on Worker Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3652-3673, December.
    7. Prieur, Fabien & Bréchet, Thierry, 2013. "Can Education Be Good For Both Growth And The Environment?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(05), pages 1135-1157, July.
    8. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    9. Beatty, Timothy K.M. & Shimshack, Jay P., 2014. "Air pollution and children's respiratory health: A cohort analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 39-57.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Semiconductor Human capital; Pollution; Resource curse;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects

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