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Environmental Policy and Growthwhen Environmental Awarenessis Endogenous

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  • Karine Constant
  • Marion Davin

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between environmental policy and growth whengreen preferences are endogenously determined by education and pollution. We consideran environmental policy in which the government implements a tax on pollution andrecycles the revenue to fund pollution abatement activities and/or an education subsidy(influencing green behaviors). When the sensitivity of agents’ environmental preferencesto pollution and human capital is high, the economy can converge to a balanced growthpath equilibrium with damped oscillations. We show that this environmental policy canboth remove the oscillations, associated with intergenerational inequalities, and enhancethe long-term growth rate. However, this solution requires that the revenue from the taxrate must be allocated to education and direct environmental protection simultaneously.We demonstrate that this type of mixed-instrument environment policy is an effectiveway to address environmental and economic issues in both the short and the long run

Suggested Citation

  • Karine Constant & Marion Davin, 2016. "Environmental Policy and Growthwhen Environmental Awarenessis Endogenous," Working Papers 16-08, LAMETA, Universtiy of Montpellier.
  • Handle: RePEc:lam:wpaper:16-08
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    File URL: http://www.lameta.univ-montp1.fr/Documents/DR2016-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lamperti, Francesco & Napoletano, Mauro & Roventini, Andrea, 2020. "Green Transitions And The Prevention Of Environmental Disasters: Market-Based Vs. Command-And-Control Policies," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(7), pages 1861-1880, October.
    2. Ulucak, Recep & Koçak, Emrah & Erdoğan, Seyfettin & Kassouri, Yacouba, 2020. "Investigating the non-linear effects of globalization on material consumption in the EU countries: Evidence from PSTR estimation," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    3. Zafar, Muhammad Wasif & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Sinha, Avik & Sengupta, Tuhin & Qin, Quande, 2020. "How Renewable Energy Consumption Contribute to Environmental Quality? The Role of Education in OECD Countries," MPRA Paper 100259, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 May 2020.
    4. Karine Constant & Marion Davin, 2019. "Unequal Vulnerability to Climate Change and the Transmission of Adverse Effects Through International Trade," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 74(2), pages 727-759, October.
    5. Prieur, Fabien & Zou, Benteng, 2018. "Climate politics: How public persuasion affects the trade-off between environmental and economic performance," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 63-72.

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