IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/wpceem/hal-01947416.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Unequal vulnerability to climate change and the transmission of adverse effects through international trade

Author

Listed:
  • Karine Constant

    (ERUDITE - Equipe de Recherche sur l’Utilisation des Données Individuelles en lien avec la Théorie Economique - UPEM - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée - UPEC UP12 - Université Paris-Est Créteil Val-de-Marne - Paris 12)

  • Marion Davin

    () (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - FRE2010 - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier)

Abstract

In this paper, we consider the unequal distribution of climate change damages in the world and we examine how the underlying costs can spread from a vulnerable to a non-vulnerable country through international trade. To focus on such indirect effects, we treat this topic in a North-South trade overlapping generations model in which the South is vulnerable to the damages entailed by global pollution while the North is not. We show that the impact of climate change in the South can be a source of welfare loss for northern consumers, in both the short and the long run. In the long run, an increase in the South's vulnerability can reduce the welfare in the North economy even in the case in which it improves its terms of trade. In the short run, the South's vulnerability can also represent a source of intergenerational inequity in the North. Therefore, we emphasize the strong economic incentives for non-vulnerable - and a fortiori less-vulnerable - economies to reduce the climate change damages on - more - vulnerable countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Karine Constant & Marion Davin, 2018. "Unequal vulnerability to climate change and the transmission of adverse effects through international trade," CEE-M Working Papers hal-01947416, CEE-M, Universtiy of Montpellier, CNRS, INRA, Montpellier SupAgro.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpceem:hal-01947416
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.umontpellier.fr/hal-01947416
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://hal.umontpellier.fr/hal-01947416/document
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Schenker, Oliver & Stephan, Gunter, 2014. "Give and take: How the funding of adaptation to climate change can improve the donor's terms-of-trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 44-55.
    2. Harald Fadinger & Pablo Fleiss, 2011. "Trade and Sectoral Productivity," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(555), pages 958-989, September.
    3. Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2010. "Climate Shocks and Exports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 454-459, May.
    4. Hélène Ollivier, 2016. "North–South Trade and Heterogeneous Damages from Local and Global Pollution," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(2), pages 337-355, October.
    5. Arik Levinson & M. Scott Taylor, 2008. "Unmasking The Pollution Haven Effect," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(1), pages 223-254, February.
    6. John, A & Pecchenino, R, 1994. "An Overlapping Generations Model of Growth and the Environment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1393-1410, November.
    7. Alain Ayong Le Kama & Aude Pommeret, 2016. "Supplementing domestic mitigation and adaptation with emissions reduction abroad to face climate change," Post-Print hal-01386053, HAL.
    8. Larry Karp & Armon Rezai, 2014. "The Political Economy Of Environmental Policy With Overlapping Generations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 711-733, August.
    9. Howarth, Richard B & Norgaard, Richard B, 1992. "Environmental Valuation under Sustainable Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 473-477, May.
    10. Simon Dietz & Nicholas Stern, 2015. "Endogenous Growth, Convexity of Damage and Climate Risk: How Nordhaus' Framework Supports Deep Cuts in Carbon Emissions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(583), pages 574-620, March.
    11. Cole, Matthew A. & Elliott, Robert J.R. & Shimamoto, Kenichi, 2005. "Industrial characteristics, environmental regulations and air pollution: an analysis of the UK manufacturing sector," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 121-143, July.
    12. Brian R. Copeland & M. Scott Taylor, 2004. "Trade, Growth, and the Environment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 7-71, March.
    13. Oliver Schenker, 2013. "Exchanging Goods and Damages: The Role of Trade on the Distribution of Climate Change Costs," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(2), pages 261-282, February.
    14. Schumacher, Ingmar & Zou, Benteng, 2008. "Pollution perception: A challenge for intergenerational equity," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 296-309, May.
    15. H. Oniki & H. Uzawa, 1965. "Patterns of Trade and Investment in a Dynamic Model of International Trade," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 15-37.
    16. Broner, Fernando A & Bustos, Paula & Carvalho, Vasco M, 2012. "Sources of Comparative Advantage in Polluting Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 9111, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. repec:clg:wpaper:2008-02 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. repec:eee:jeeman:v:84:y:2017:i:c:p:189-208 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline & Mouez Fodha, 2005. "Double Dividend with Involuntary Unemployment: Efficiency and Intergenerational Equity," Post-Print halshs-00089913, HAL.
    20. Dietz, Simon & Stern, Nicholas, 2015. "Endogenous growth, convexity of damage and climate risk: how Nordhaus’ framework supports deep cuts in carbon emissions," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58406, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Seegmuller, Thomas & Verchere, Alban, 2004. "Pollution as a source of endogenous fluctuations and periodic welfare inequality in OLG economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 84(3), pages 363-369, September.
    22. William R Kerr, 2018. "Heterogeneous Technology Diffusion and Ricardian Trade Patterns," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 32(1), pages 163-182.
    23. Managi, Shunsuke & Hibiki, Akira & Tsurumi, Tetsuya, 2009. "Does trade openness improve environmental quality?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 346-363, November.
    24. repec:cup:macdyn:v:23:y:2019:i:03:p:1102-1136_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. Arnaud Costinot & Dave Donaldson & Cory Smith, 2016. "Evolving Comparative Advantage and the Impact of Climate Change in Agricultural Markets: Evidence from 1.7 Million Fields around the World," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(1), pages 205-248.
    26. Constant, Karine & Davin, Marion, 2019. "Environmental Policy And Growth When Environmental Awareness Is Endogenous," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(03), pages 1102-1136, April.
    27. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2012. "Temperature Shocks and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Last Half Century," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 66-95, July.
    28. Roussey, Ludivine & Soubeyran, Raphael, 2018. "Overburdened judges," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 21-32.
    29. Mikhail Golosov & John Hassler & Per Krusell & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2014. "Optimal Taxes on Fossil Fuel in General Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(1), pages 41-88, January.
    30. Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline & Mouez Fodha, 2005. "Double Dividend with Involuntary Unemployment: Efficiency and Intergenerational Equity," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 31(4), pages 389-403, August.
    31. Mendelsohn, Robert & Dinar, Ariel & Williams, Larry, 2006. "The distributional impact of climate change on rich and poor countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 159-178, April.
    32. Varvarigos, Dimitrios, 2011. "Non-monotonic welfare dynamics in a growing economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 303-312, June.
    33. Cole, Matthew A. & Elliott, Robert J.R. & Wu, Shanshan, 2008. "Industrial activity and the environment in China: An industry-level analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 393-408, September.
    34. Matthew A. Cole & Robert J. R. Elliott, 2005. "FDI and the Capital Intensity of "Dirty" Sectors: A Missing Piece of the Pollution Haven Puzzle," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 530-548, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    overlapping generations; international trade; heterogeneous damages; climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:wpceem:hal-01947416. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laurent Garnier). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lamplfr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.