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Can Education Be Good For Both Growth And The Environment?

Author

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  • Prieur, Fabien
  • Bréchet, Thierry

Abstract

We develop an overlapping-generations model of growth and the environment in relation to public policy on education. Beyond the traditional mechanisms through which knowledge, growth, and the environment interplay, we stress the role played by education in environmental awareness. Assuming first that environmental awareness is constant, we show the existence of a balanced-growth path (BGP) along which environmental quality increases continually. Then, if education enhances environmental awareness, the equilibrium properties are modified: the economy can reach a steady state or converge to an asymptotic BGP. Therefore, education does not necessarily promote sustained and sustainable growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Prieur, Fabien & Bréchet, Thierry, 2013. "Can Education Be Good For Both Growth And The Environment?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(5), pages 1135-1157, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:17:y:2013:i:05:p:1135-1157_00
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karine Constant & Marion Davin, 2014. "Environmental Policy and Growth in a Model with Endogenous Environmental Awareness," AMSE Working Papers 1405, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France, revised Mar 2014.
    2. Chu, Hsun & Lai, Ching-chong & Liao, Chih-hsing, 2016. "A Note On Environment-Dependent Time Preferences," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 1652-1667, September.
    3. Schumacher, Ingmar & Zou, Benteng, 2015. "Threshold preferences and the environment," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 17-27.
    4. Schumacher, Ingmar, 2015. "The endogenous formation of an environmental culture," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 200-221.
    5. Le Coent, Philippe & Préget, Raphaële & Thoyer, Sophie, 2017. "Compensating Environmental Losses Versus Creating Environmental Gains: Implications for Biodiversity Offsets," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 120-129.
    6. Thierry Bréchet & Natali Hritonenko & Yuri Yatsenko, 2013. "Adaptation and Mitigation in Long-term Climate Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(2), pages 217-243, June.
    7. Constant, Karine & Davin, Marion, 2019. "Environmental Policy And Growth When Environmental Awareness Is Endogenous," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(3), pages 1102-1136, April.
    8. repec:ipg:wpaper:13 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Takumi Motoyama, 2016. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation with Pollution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 16-03, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    10. Fabien Prieur & Benteng Zou, 2017. "On the impact of indirect competition for political influence on environmental policy," CREA Discussion Paper Series 17-16, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    11. Prieur, Fabien & Zou, Benteng, 2018. "Climate politics: How public persuasion affects the trade-off between environmental and economic performance," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 63-72.
    12. repec:ipg:wpaper:15 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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