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Climate policy targets in emerging and industrialized economies: the influence of technological differences, environmental preferences and propensity to save

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  • Birgit Bednar-Friedl

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  • Birgit Bednar-Friedl, 2012. "Climate policy targets in emerging and industrialized economies: the influence of technological differences, environmental preferences and propensity to save," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 191-215, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:39:y:2012:i:2:p:191-215
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-012-9187-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juan Carlos Bárcena-Ruiz, 2006. "Environmental Taxes and First-Mover Advantages," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 35(1), pages 19-39, September.
    2. MacKenzie, Ian A., 2011. "Tradable permit allocations and sequential choice," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 268-278, January.
    3. World Bank, 2010. "World Development Report 2010," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4387, September.
    4. Eyckmans, Johan & Kverndokk, Snorre, 2010. "Moral concerns on tradable pollution permits in international environmental agreements," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 1814-1823, July.
    5. Bréchet, Thierry & Lambrecht, Stéphane & Prieur, Fabien, 2009. "Intertemporal transfers of emission quotas in climate policies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 126-134, January.
    6. Robert W. Staiger & Kyle Bagwell, 1999. "An Economic Theory of GATT," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 215-248, March.
    7. Copeland, Brian R. & Taylor, M. Scott, 2005. "Free trade and global warming: a trade theory view of the Kyoto protocol," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-234, March.
    8. Tetsuo Ono, 2002. "The Effects of Emission Permits on Growth and the Environment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 75-87, January.
    9. Smulders, Sjak & Gradus, Raymond, 1996. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 505-532, November.
    10. Bednar-Friedl, Birgit & Farmer, Karl, 2010. "External balance, dynamic efficiency, and the welfare effects of unilateral and multilateral permit policies in interdependent economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 980-990, September.
    11. Dritan Osmani & Richard Tol, 2009. "Toward Farsightedly Stable International Environmental Agreements," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(3), pages 455-492, June.
    12. Durlauf, Steven N & Johnson, Paul A, 1995. "Multiple Regimes and Cross-Country Growth Behaviour," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(4), pages 365-384, Oct.-Dec..
    13. Carbone, Jared C. & Helm, Carsten & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2009. "The case for international emission trade in the absence of cooperative climate policy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 266-280, November.
    14. Jouvet, Pierre-Andre & Michel, Philippe & Rotillon, Gilles, 2005. "Optimal growth with pollution: how to use pollution permits?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1597-1609, September.
    15. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Karl Farmer, 2011. "Nationally and Internationally Optimal Climate Policies: External Balances versus Environmental Preferences," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(3), pages 432-457, September.
    16. repec:cor:louvrp:-2126 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Hoel, Michael, 1991. "Global environmental problems: The effects of unilateral actions taken by one country," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 55-70, January.
    18. John, A & Pecchenino, R, 1994. "An Overlapping Generations Model of Growth and the Environment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(427), pages 1393-1410, November.
    19. Helm, Carsten, 2003. "International emissions trading with endogenous allowance choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(12), pages 2737-2747, December.
    20. de la Croix,David & Michel,Philippe, 2002. "A Theory of Economic Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521806428.
    21. Durlauf, Steven N. & Johnson, Paul A., 1994. "Multiple Regimes And Cross-Country Growth Behavior," SSRI Workshop Series 292705, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute.
    22. Barrett, Scott, 1994. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 878-894, Supplemen.
    23. Johan Eyckmans & Michael Finus, 2007. "Measures to enhance the success of global climate treaties," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 73-97, March.
    24. Tol, Richard S J, 2001. "Climate Coalitions in an Integrated Assessment Model," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 159-172, October.
    25. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Karl Farmer, 2012. "Public Debt, Terms of Trade and Welfare: The Role of Capital Production Shares, External Balances, and Dynamic (In)efficiency," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 317-349, October.
    26. Bianconi, Marcelo, 2003. "Fiscal Policy and the Terms of Trade in an Analytical Two-Country Dynamic Model," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(1), pages 25-41, January.
    27. Hans-Peter Weikard & Rob Dellink & Ekko Ierland, 2010. "Renegotiations in the Greenhouse," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 45(4), pages 573-596, April.
    28. Bohringer, Christoph & Vogt, Carsten, 2004. "The dismantling of a breakthrough: the Kyoto Protocol as symbolic policy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 597-617, September.
    29. Kuik, Onno & Brander, Luke & Tol, Richard S.J., 2009. "Marginal abatement costs of greenhouse gas emissions: A meta-analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1395-1403, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Margaret Insley & Tracy Snoddon & Peter A. Forsyth, 2018. "Strategic interactions and uncertainty in decisions to curb greenhouse gas emissions," Working Papers 1805, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised 06 Jan 2018.

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