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Emissions Trading Regimes and Incentives to Participate in International Climate Agreements

Author

Listed:
  • Barbara Buchner

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Carlo Carraro

    (University of Venice, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, CEPR, CESifo and CEPS)

Abstract

This paper analyses whether different emissions trading regimes provide different incentives to participate in a cooperative climate agreement. Different incentive structures are discussed for those countries, namely the US, Russia and China, that are most important in the climate negotiation process. Our analysis confirms the conjecture that, by appropriately designing the emission trading regime, it is possible to enhance the incentives to participate in a climate agreement. Therefore, participation and optimal policy should be jointly analysed. Moreover, our results show that the US, Russia and China have different most preferred climate coalitions and therefore adopt conflicting negotiation strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro, 2003. "Emissions Trading Regimes and Incentives to Participate in International Climate Agreements," Working Papers 2003.104, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2003.104
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    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/Publication/NDL2003/NDL2003-104.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlo Carraro & Barbara Buchner, 2003. "China and the Evolution of the Present Climate Regime," Working Papers 2003.103, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Nordhaus, William D & Yang, Zili, 1996. "A Regional Dynamic General-Equilibrium Model of Alternative Climate-Change Strategies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 741-765, September.
    3. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1999. "The Kyoto Protocol: A Cost-Effective Strategy for Meeting Environmental Objectives?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-23.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Johan Eyckmans & Michael Finus, 2006. "New roads to international environmental agreements: the case of global warming," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 7(4), pages 391-414, December.
    2. Michael Finus & Ekko Ierland & Rob Dellink, 2006. "Stability of Climate Coalitions in a Cartel Formation Game," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 271-291, August.
    3. Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro & A. Denny Ellerman, 2006. "The Allocation of European Union Allowances: Lessons, Unifying Themes and General Principles," Working Papers 0615, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research.
    4. Wu, Pei-Ing & Chen, Chai Tzu & Cheng, Pei-Ching & Liou, Je-Liang, 2014. "Climate game analyses for CO2 emission trading among various world organizations," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 441-446.
    5. Michael Finus & Juan-Carlos Altamirano-Cabrera & Ekko Ierland, 2005. "The effect of membership rules and voting schemes on the success of international climate agreements," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 95-127, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agreements; Climate; Incentives; Negotiations; Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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