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The Allocation of European Union Allowances: Lessons, Unifying Themes and General Principles

Author

Listed:
  • Barbara K. Buchner

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Carlo Carraro

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and University of Venice)

  • A. Denny Ellerman

    (Senior Lecturer at MIT)

Abstract

This paper is the concluding chapter of Rights, Rents and Fairness: Allocation in the European Emissions Trading Scheme, edited by the co-authors and forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. The main objective of this paper is to distill the lessons and general principles to be learnt from the allocation of allowances in the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS), i.e. in the world’s first experience with allocating carbon allowances to sub-national entities. We discuss the lessons that emerge from this experience and make some comments on what seem to be more general principles informing the allocation process and on what are the global implications of the EU ETS. As has become obvious during the first allocation phase, the diversity of experience among the Member States is considerable, so that it must be understood that these lessons and unifying themes are drawn from the experience of most of the Member States, not necessarily from all. Lessons and unifying observations are grouped in three categories: those concerning the conditions encountered, the processes employed, and the actual choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Barbara K. Buchner & Carlo Carraro & A. Denny Ellerman, 2006. "The Allocation of European Union Allowances: Lessons, Unifying Themes and General Principles," Working Papers 2006.116, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2006.116
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barbara Buchner & Carlo Carraro, 2003. "Emissions Trading Regimes and Incentives to Participate in International Climate Agreements," Working Papers 2003.104, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Tom Tietenberg, 2003. "The Tradable-Permits Approach to Protecting the Commons: Lessons for Climate Change," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 400-419.
    3. Cramton, Peter & Kerr, Suzi, 2002. "Tradeable carbon permit auctions: How and why to auction not grandfather," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 333-345, March.
    4. Richard Schmalensee & Paul L. Joskow & A. Denny Ellerman & Juan Pablo Montero & Elizabeth M. Bailey, 1998. "An Interim Evaluation of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 53-68, Summer.
    5. Joachim Schleich & Regina Betz, 2004. "EU emissions trading and transaction costs for small and medium sized companies," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 39(3), pages 121-123, May.
    6. Ellerman,A. Denny & Joskow,Paul L. & Schmalensee,Richard & Montero,Juan-Pablo & Bailey,Elizabeth M., 2005. "Markets for Clean Air," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521023894.
      • Ellerman,A. Denny & Joskow,Paul L. & Schmalensee,Richard & Montero,Juan-Pablo & Bailey,Elizabeth M., 2000. "Markets for Clean Air," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521660839.
    7. Robert N. Stavins, 1998. "What Can We Learn from the Grand Policy Experiment? Lessons from SO2 Allowance Trading," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 69-88, Summer.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oberndorfer, Ulrich, 2008. "EU Emission Allowances and the Stock Market: Evidence from the Electricity Industry," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-059, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Streimikiene, Dalia & Roos, Inge, 2009. "GHG emission trading implications on energy sector in Baltic States," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 854-862, May.
    3. Gilbert E. Metcalf & Sergey Paltsev & John Reilly & Henry Jacoby & Jennifer F. Holak, 2008. "Analysis of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Tax Proposals," NBER Working Papers 13980, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Feng, Zhen-Hua & Wei, Yi-Ming & Wang, Kai, 2012. "Estimating risk for the carbon market via extreme value theory: An empirical analysis of the EU ETS," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 97-108.
    5. repec:spr:annopr:v:255:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10479-015-1864-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jos Sijm, 2012. "Tradable Carbon Allowances: The Experience of the European Union and Lessons Learned," Chapters,in: Responding to Climate Change, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2010. "An overview of current research on EU ETS: Evidence from its operating mechanism and economic effect," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 87(6), pages 1804-1814, June.
    8. Bao-jun Tang & Cheng Shen & Yi-fan Zhao, 2015. "Market risk in carbon market: an empirical analysis of the EUA and sCER," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(2), pages 333-346, February.
    9. Adrien de Hauteclocque & Yannick Perez, 2011. "Law & Economics Perspectives on Electricity Regulation," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/21, European University Institute.
    10. Tang, Bao-jun & Shen, Cheng & Gao, Chao, 2013. "The efficiency analysis of the European CO2 futures market," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1544-1547.
    11. Oberndorfer, Ulrich, 2009. "EU Emission Allowances and the stock market: Evidence from the electricity industry," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 1116-1126, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate Change; Emission Trading; Allocation; Fairness; EU Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

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