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Do differences in attitudes explain differences in national climate change policies?

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  • Tjernström, E.
  • Tietenberg, T.

Abstract

In meeting the threat posed by climate change nations have responded quite differently. Using an extensive data set this study explores factors that affect individuals' attitudes towards climate change and how those attitudes ultimately affect national climate change policy. The results show that attitudes do indeed matter in implementing policy and that attitudes are shaped not only by how individuals react to the specific attributes of climate change, but also by information, by the openness of society and by attitudes toward the trustworthiness of government.

Suggested Citation

  • Tjernström, E. & Tietenberg, T., 2008. "Do differences in attitudes explain differences in national climate change policies?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 315-324, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:65:y:2008:i:2:p:315-324
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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Blake & M'Gonigle, Michael, 2012. "Does ecological economics have a future?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 37-48.
    2. Pollitt, M., 2010. "Green Values in Communities: How and why to engage individuals with decarbonisation targets," Working Papers wp398, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    3. repec:spr:jhappi:v:19:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9809-y is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:ecolec:v:151:y:2018:i:c:p:173-183 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Robert Gampfer, 2016. "Minilateralism or the UNFCCC? The Political Feasibility of Climate Clubs," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 16(3), pages 62-88, August.
    6. Joseph Anthony L. Reyes, 2016. "Exploring relationships of environmental attitudes, behaviors, and sociodemographic indicators to aspects of discourses: analyses of International Social Survey Programme data in the Philippines," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 18(6), pages 1575-1599, December.
    7. repec:eee:aumajo:v:21:y:2013:i:4:p:212-217 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Louis Jaeck, 2011. "Information and political failures: to what extent does rational ignorance explain irrational beliefs formation?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 287-301, September.
    9. Morrison, Mark & Duncan, Roderick & Parton, Kevin & Sherley, Chris, 2013. "The Relationship between Religious Persuasion and Climate Change Attitudes in Australia," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152147, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    10. Chankrajang, Thanyaporn & Muttarak, Raya, 2017. "Green Returns to Education: Does Schooling Contribute to Pro-Environmental Behaviours? Evidence from Thailand," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 434-448.
    11. Jeżewska-Zychowicz, Marzena & Jeznach, Maria, 2015. "Consumers’ Behaviours Related To Packaging And Their Attitudes Towards Environment," Journal of Agribusiness and Rural Development, University of Life Sciences, Poznan, Poland, issue Issue 37.
    12. Alberto M. Zanni & Abigail L. Bristow & Mark Wardman, 2013. "The potential behavioural effect of personal carbon trading: results from an experimental survey," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 222-243, July.
    13. Dorsch, Michael, 2011. "The Willingness to Pay for Environmental Protection: Are Developing Economies Different?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 24, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    14. Aysha Fleming & Frank Vanclay & Claire Hiller & Stephen Wilson, 2014. "Challenging dominant discourses of climate change," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 407-418, December.
    15. Vanja WESTERBERG & Jette BREDAHL JACOBSEN & Robert LIFRAN, 2012. "The Multi-faceted Nature of Preferences for Offshore Wind Farm Siting," Working Papers 12-22, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier, revised Jul 2012.
    16. Diego Comin & Johannes Rode, 2013. "From Green Users to Green Voters," NBER Working Papers 19219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Adaman, Fikret & KaralI, Nihan & Kumbaroglu, Gürkan & Or, Ilhan & Özkaynak, Begüm & Zenginobuz, Ünal, 2011. "What determines urban households' willingness to pay for CO2 emission reductions in Turkey: A contingent valuation survey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 689-698, February.
    18. Andreas Ziegler, 2015. "On the relevance of ideological identification and environmental values for beliefs and attitudes toward climate change: An empirical cross country analysis," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201516, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    19. Martinsson, Johan & Lundqvist, Lennart J. & Sundström, Aksel, 2011. "Energy saving in Swedish households. The (relative) importance of environmental attitudes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5182-5191, September.
    20. repec:eee:eneeco:v:63:y:2017:i:c:p:144-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:679-:d:96707 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Kachi, Aya & Bernauer, Thomas & Gampfer, Robert, 2015. "Climate policy in hard times: Are the pessimists right?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 227-241.
    23. Karine Constant & Marion Davin, 2016. "Environmental Policy and Growthwhen Environmental Awarenessis Endogenous," Working Papers 16-08, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier.
    24. Andersson, David & Nässén, Jonas & Larsson, Jörgen & Holmberg, John, 2014. "Greenhouse gas emissions and subjective well-being: An analysis of Swedish households," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 75-82.

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