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A model of urban demography

Author

Listed:
  • Hiroshi Aiura

    () (Faculty of Economics, Oita University (Japan))

  • Yasuhiro Sato

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University (Japan))

Abstract

This paper develops an overlapping generations model that involves the endogenous determination of fertility and an explicit city structure in order to analyze fully the social and natural changes in city populations. We provide conditions under which the model exhibits the spatial features of demography observed in large Japanese cities. We also show by calibration that the low cost of obtaining human capital in Tokyo metropolitan area played a significant role in establishing its urban primacy in Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiroshi Aiura & Yasuhiro Sato, 2009. "A model of urban demography," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-18-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Nov 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0918r
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    Cited by:

    1. Evert Meijers & Martijn Burger & Gilles Duranton, 2016. "Determinants of city growth in Colombia," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(1), pages 101-131, March.
    2. Tadashi Morita & Yasuhiro Sato & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2020. "Demographics and competition for capital in political economy," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(4), pages 865-889, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    urbanization; demography; migration; monocentric city;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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