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Geography and Demography: New Economic Geography with Endogenous Fertility

Listed author(s):
  • Hiroshi Goto

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

  • Keiya Minamimura

    (Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University)

To explain the links between population distribution and economic integration, we construct a spatial economics model with endogenous fertility. A higher population concentration increases real wages and child-raising costs, thus lowering the fertility rate. However, people migrate to more populated regions to obtain higher real wages. We show that mobility across regions results in more people flowing into highly populated regions, but lowers fertility rates there. The population growth path resembles a logistic curve in the early phase, but population decreases in the last phase. Additionally, economic integration leads to population concentration and decreases population size in the whole economy.

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File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2015-33.pdf
File Function: First version, 2015
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Paper provided by Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University in its series Discussion Paper Series with number DP2015-33.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2015
Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-33
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  1. Akiko Maruyama & Kazuhiro Yamamoto, 2010. "Variety expansion and fertility rates," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 57-71, January.
  2. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mary Borg, 1989. "The Income-Fertility Relationship: Effect of the Net Price of a Child," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(2), pages 301-310, May.
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  6. KONDO Keisuke, 2015. "Does Agglomeration Discourage Fertility? Evidence from the Japanese General Social Survey 2000-2010," Discussion papers 15067, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  7. Hiroshi Goto & Keiya Minamimura, 2014. "Fertility, Regional Demographics, and Economic Integration," Discussion Papers 1405, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  8. Zhihao Yu, 2005. "Trade, market size, and industrial structure: revisiting the home-market effect," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(1), pages 255-272, February.
  9. Frédéric Docquier, 2004. "Income Distribution, Non-convexities and the Fertility-Income Relationship," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(281), pages 261-273, 05.
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  14. Schultz, T Paul, 1985. "Changing World Prices, Women's Wages, and the Fertility Transition: Sweden, 1860-1910," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1126-1154, December.
  15. Sato, Yasuhiro & Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, 2005. "Population concentration, urbanization, and demographic transition," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 45-61, July.
  16. Krugman, Paul, 1993. "On the number and location of cities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 293-298, April.
  17. Behrens, Kristian & Lamorgese, Andrea R. & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Tabuchi, Takatoshi, 2009. "Beyond the home market effect: Market size and specialization in a multi-country world," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 259-265, November.
  18. Gary S. Becker & Robert J. Barro, 1988. "A Reformulation of the Economic Theory of Fertility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(1), pages 1-25.
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