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Making Economic Growth more Socially Inclusive in Germany

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  • Andreas Kappeler

    (OECD)

  • Andrés Fuentes Hutfilter

    (OECD)

Abstract

While past labour market reforms have been successful in terms of employment, the relative poverty risk and income inequality have remained broadly unchanged in recent years. Some social groups remain particularly vulnerable, including individuals in non-regular employment, the unemployed and the low skilled. If in employment, their jobs tend to be unstable and wages and income mobility low. Continued efforts are needed to foster economic growth in a more inclusive manner, such that the most vulnerable groups benefit from and contribute to economic growth more strongly and such that the gaps between the rich and the poor in terms of income and wellbeing are reduced. These efforts should include enhancing the labour market outcomes of the most vulnerable and increase upward income mobility among disadvantaged individuals; strengthening skills at the lower end of the skills distribution; revising the tax and benefit system to improve incentives and to ensure efficient and well-targeted redistribution; and to make health and old-age pension insurance more inclusive. This working paper relates to the 2014 OECD Economic Survey of Germany (http://www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/economic-survey-germany.htm). Rendre la croissance économique plus inclusive en Allemagne Alors que les réformes du marché du travail opérées dans le passé ont été bénéfiques en termes d’emploi, le risque de pauvreté relative et les inégalités de revenus n’ont quasiment pas changé ces dernières années. Certains groupes sociaux restent particulièrement vulnérables, notamment les personnes ayant un emploi précaire, les chômeurs et les personnes peu qualifiées. Lorsque les personnes concernées ont un travail, il s’agit généralement d’emplois peu stables, et les salaires sont bas et la mobilité salariale faible. Il est nécessaire de poursuivre les efforts, pour faire en sorte que les groupes les plus vulnérables puissent bénéficier d’une croissance économique plus vigoureuse et y contribuer, pour accroître la mobilité à la hausse des revenus parmi les personnes défavorisées et pour atténuer les inégalités. L’accent devrait être mis sur les instruments de l’action publique permettant à la fois de réduire les inégalités de revenus et de doper la croissance du PIB. Il s’agit notamment d’améliorer le devenir professionnel des plus vulnérables; de renforcer les compétences au bas de l’échelle de distribution des compétences; de réviser le système de prélèvements et de prestations pour améliorer les incitations; et assurer une redistribution efficiente et bien ciblée; et rendre l’assurance santé et l’assurance retraite plus inclusives. Ce document de travail se rapporte à l'Étude économique de l'OCDE de l’Allemagne 2014 (http://www.oecd.org/fr/eco/etudes/etude-economique-allemagne.htm).

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Kappeler & Andrés Fuentes Hutfilter, 2014. "Making Economic Growth more Socially Inclusive in Germany," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1175, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:1175-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5jxrmdjk28kg-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Allemagne; croissance inclusive; education; enseignement; Germany; health; imposition; inclusive growth; income inequality; labour markets; marché du travail; old age poverty; pauvreté chez les plus âgés; santé; taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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