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What Active Labour Market Programmes Work for Immigrants in Europe?

  • Walter, Thomas
  • Butschek, Sebastian

In this paper, we provide a quantitative answer to the question what types of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) work for immigrants. From the existing literature, we identify 24 research papers estimating 79 short-run treatment effects of ALMPs on immigrants. We perform a meta-analysis of these findings based on the sign and significance of the estimates. This allows us to present quantitative evidence for the relative effectiveness for immigrants of different types of ALMPs. Our finding that only subsidised private-sector employment can be recommended is relevant to European policymakers allocating scarce resources in the face of high immigrant unemployment.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79745/1/VfS_2013_pid_732.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79745.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79745
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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  1. Thomas Liebig, 2007. "The Labour Market Integration of Immigrants in Germany," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 47, OECD Publishing.
  2. Pernilla Andersson Joona & Lena Nekby, 2012. "Intensive Coaching of New Immigrants: An Evaluation Based on Random Program Assignment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 575-600, 06.
  3. Stephan L. Thomsen & Thomas Walter, 2010. "Temporary Extra Jobs for Immigrants: Merging Lane to Employment or Dead‐End Road in Welfare?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(s1), pages 114-140, December.
  4. Kluve, Jochen, 2010. "The effectiveness of European active labor market programs," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 904-918, December.
  5. Gerard J. van den Berg & Bas van der Klaauw & Jan C. van Ours, 2004. "Punitive Sanctions and the Transition Rate from Welfare to Work," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 211-241, January.
  6. Marco Caliendo & Steffen Künn, 2010. "Start-up Subsidies for the Unemployed: Long-Term Evidence and Effect Heterogeneity," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 985, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Annette Bergemann & Gerard van den Berg, 2006. "Active labour market policy effects for women in Europe - a survey," IFS Working Papers W06/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Aldashev, Alisher & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Walter, Thomas, 2010. "Short-term training programs for immigrants: do effects differ from natives and why?," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-021, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  9. Ulf Rinne, 2013. "The evaluation of immigration policies," Chapters, in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 28, pages 530-552 Edward Elgar.
  10. Clausen, Jens & Heinesen, Eskil & Hummelgaard, Hans & Husted, Leif & Rosholm, Michael, 2009. "The effect of integration policies on the time until regular employment of newly arrived immigrants: Evidence from Denmark," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 409-417, August.
  11. Bernhard, Sarah & Gartner, Hermann & Stephan, Gesine, 2008. "Wage Subsidies for Needy Job-Seekers and Their Effect on Individual Labour Market Outcomes after the German Reforms," IZA Discussion Papers 3772, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Eskil Heinesen & Leif Husted & Michael Rosholm, 2013. "The effects of active labour market policies for immigrants receiving social assistance in Denmark," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-22, December.
  13. Andrén, Thomas & Andrén, Daniela, 2004. "Assessing The Employment Effects Of Vocational Training Using A One-Factor Model," Working Papers in Economics 133, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  14. Olof Åslund & Per Johansson, 2011. "Virtues of SIN: Can Intensified Public Efforts Help Disadvantaged Immigrants?," Evaluation Review, , vol. 35(4), pages 399-427, August.
  15. Thomas Liebig, 2007. "The Labour Market Integration of Immigrants in Australia," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 49, OECD Publishing.
  16. Thomas Liebig, 2007. "The Labour Market Integration of Immigrants in Denmark," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 50, OECD Publishing.
  17. Martin Huber & Michael Lechner & Conny Wunsch & Thomas Walter, 2011. "Do German Welfare‐to‐Work Programmes Reduce Welfare Dependency and Increase Employment?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(2), pages 182-204, 05.
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