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Long memory, strcutural breaks and mean shifts in the inflation rates in Nigeria

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  • Luis Alberiko Gil-Alaña

    () (Navarra Center for International Development)

  • Olanrewaju L. Shittu
  • OlaOluwa S. Yaya

Abstract

This paper deals with the analysis of the inflation rate in Nigeria. We use long range dependence techniques based on fractional integration or I(d) models, incorporating structural breaks in the model. The results indicate that inflation in Nigeria displays long memory behaviour, with an order of integration of about 0.3 in spite of the existence of breaks at different periods. Including the growth rate of money (M1) as an exogenous term, the results indicate that this variable significantly affects inflation two and three periods (quarters) after the initial shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Alberiko Gil-Alaña & Olanrewaju L. Shittu & OlaOluwa S. Yaya, 2011. "Long memory, strcutural breaks and mean shifts in the inflation rates in Nigeria," NCID Working Papers 04/2011, Navarra Center for International Development, University of Navarra.
  • Handle: RePEc:nva:unnvaa:wp04-2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary G. Moser, 1995. "The Main Determinants of Inflation in Nigeria," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(2), pages 270-289, June.
    2. Ohanissian, Arek & Russell, Jeffrey R. & Tsay, Ruey S., 2008. "True or Spurious Long Memory? A New Test," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 26, pages 161-175, April.
    3. Hassler, Uwe & Wolters, Jurgen, 1995. "Long Memory in Inflation Rates: International Evidence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(1), pages 37-45, January.
    4. Walter Kramer & Philipp Sibbertsen, 2002. "Testing for Structural Changes in the Presence of Long Memory," International Journal of Business and Economics, School of Management Development, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 1(3), pages 235-242, December.
    5. David K. Backus & Stanley E. Zin, 1993. "Long-memory inflation uncertainty: evidence from the term structure of interest rates," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 681-708.
    6. Granger, Clive W. J. & Hyung, Namwon, 2004. "Occasional structural breaks and long memory with an application to the S&P 500 absolute stock returns," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 399-421, June.
    7. Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2008. "Fractional integration and structural breaks at unknown periods of time," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 163-185, January.
    8. Baillie, Richard T & Chung, Ching-Fan & Tieslau, Margie A, 1996. "Analysing Inflation by the Fractionally Integrated ARFIMA-GARCH Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(1), pages 23-40, Jan.-Feb..
    9. Christopher F. Baum & John T. Barkoulas & Mustafa Caglayan, 1999. "Persistence in International Inflation Rates," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(4), pages 900-913, April.
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    11. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1980. "Two Illustrations of the Quantity Theory of Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 1005-1014, December.
    12. George T. McCandless & Warren E. Weber, 1995. "Some monetary facts," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Sum, pages 2-11.
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    Cited by:

    1. OlaOluwa S. Yaya, 2018. "Another Look At The Stationarity Of Inflation Rates In Oecd Countries: Application Of Structural Break-Garch-Based Unit Root Tests," Statistics in Transition New Series, Polish Statistical Association, vol. 19(3), pages 477-493, September.
    2. Yaya, OlaOluwa S & Ogbonna, Ahamuefula & Atoi, Ngozi V, 2019. "Are inflation rates in OECD countries actually stationary during 2011-2018? Evidence based on Fourier Nonlinear Unit root tests with Break," MPRA Paper 93937, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation rate; long memory; mean shifts; money supply;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes

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