IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/new/wpaper/1113.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Classical and Neoclassical Theories of Offshore Outsourcing

Author

Listed:
  • Deborah Winkler

    () (World Bank)

  • William Milberg

    () (Department of Economics, New School for Social Research)

Abstract

We compare neoclassical and classical theories of outsourcing. The former is premised on an improved international division of labor and predicts a rise in the return to skill. This contrasts with the classical model, which emphasizes the distribution of income between labor and capital and its implications for investment and economic growth. But the classical model needs amendment in the contemporary world: International capital mobility, wage stagnation and vertical specialization indicate that the direction of trade depends on both absolute and comparative advantage. Moreover, the classical perspective must be modified to allow for the leakage of profits into financial assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Deborah Winkler & William Milberg, 2011. "Classical and Neoclassical Theories of Offshore Outsourcing," Working Papers 1113, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1113
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org/econ/2011/NSSR_WP_132011.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. William Milberg & Deborah Winkler, 2010. "Financialisation and the dynamics of offshoring in the USA," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(2), pages 275-293, March.
    2. Kei-Mu Yi, 2003. "Can Vertical Specialization Explain the Growth of World Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(1), pages 52-102, February.
    3. Baldwin, Richard & Robert-Nicoud, Frédéric, 2007. "Offshoring: General Equilibrium Effects on Wages, Production and Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 6218, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Ronald W. Jones, 2000. "Globalization and the Theory of Input Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026210086x.
    5. Feenstra, Robert C & Hanson, Gordon H, 1996. "Globalization, Outsourcing, and Wage Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 240-245, May.
    6. Salvatore Baldone & Fabio Sdogati & Lucia Tajoli, 2007. "On Some Effects of International Fragmentation of Production on Comparative Advantages, Trade Flows and the Income of Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(11), pages 1726-1769, November.
    7. Catherine L. Mann & Jacob Funk Kirkegaard, 2006. "Accelerating the Globalization of America: The Role for Information Technology," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3900.
    8. Maneschi, Andrea, 1992. "Ricardo's International Trade Theory: Beyond the Comparative Cost Example," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 421-437, December.
    9. Akyuz, Yilmaz & Gore, Charles, 1996. "The investment-profits nexus in East Asian industrialization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 461-470, March.
    10. Gene M. Grossman & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2008. "Trading Tasks: A Simple Theory of Offshoring," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1978-1997, December.
    11. Brewer, Anthony, 1985. "Trade with fixed real wages and mobile capital," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1-2), pages 177-186, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1113. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Setterfield). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/denewus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.