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High Wage Workers Work for High Wage Firms

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  • Katarína Borovičková
  • Robert Shimer

Abstract

We develop a new approach to measuring the correlation between the types of matched workers and firms. Our approach accurately measures the correlation in data sets with many workers and firms, but a small number of independent observations for each. Using administrative data from Austria, we find that the correlation between worker and firm types lies between 0.4 and 0.6. We use artificial data sets with correlated worker and firm types to show that our estimator is accurate. In contrast, the Abowd, Kramarz and Margolis (1999) fixed effects estimator suggests no correlation between types in our data set. We show both theoretically and empirically that this reflects an incidental parameter problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Katarína Borovičková & Robert Shimer, 2017. "High Wage Workers Work for High Wage Firms," NBER Working Papers 24074, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24074
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Stéphane Bonhomme & Thibaut Lamadon & Elena Manresa, 2019. "A Distributional Framework for Matched Employer Employee Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(3), pages 699-739, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jae Song & David J Price & Fatih Guvenen & Nicholas Bloom & Till von Wachter, 2019. "Firming Up Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(1), pages 1-50.
    2. Rasmus Lentz & Suphanit Piyapromdee & Jean-Marc Robin, 2018. "On Worker and Firm Heterogeneity in Wages and Employment Mobility: Evidence from Danish Register Data," PIER Discussion Papers 91, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Aug 2018.
    3. Thibaut Lamadon & Magne Mogstad & Bradley Setzler, 2019. "Imperfect competition, compensating differentials and rent sharing in the U.S. labor market," Discussion Papers 918, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Lochner, Benjamin & Schulz, Bastian, 2020. "Firm productivity, wages, and sorting," IAB Discussion Paper 202004, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Patrick Kline & Raffaele Saggio & Mikkel Sølvsten, 2020. "Leave‐Out Estimation of Variance Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(5), pages 1859-1898, September.
    6. Torres, Sónia & Portugal, Pedro & Addison, John T. & Guimarães, Paulo, 2018. "The sources of wage variation and the direction of assortative matching: Evidence from a three-way high-dimensional fixed effects regression model," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 47-60.
    7. Simon Jäger & Benjamin Schoefer & Samuel Young & Josef Zweimüller, 2020. "Wages and the Value of Nonemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 135(4), pages 1905-1963.
    8. Lochner, Benjamin & Seth, Stefan & Wolter, Stefanie, 2020. "Decomposing the large firm wage premium in Germany," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 194(C).
    9. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Recent Changes in British Wage Inequality: Evidence from Large Firms and Occupations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 67(1), pages 100-125, February.
    10. Alexey Gorn, 2021. "The Role of Headhunters in Wage Inequality: It's All about Matching," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 40, pages 309-346, April.
    11. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Recent Changes in British Wage Inequality: Evidence from Firms and Occupations," 2017 Meeting Papers 459, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Elías Albagli & Mario Canales & Chad Syverson & Matías Tapia & Juan Wlasiuk, 2020. "Productivity Gaps and Job Flows: Evidence from Censal Microdata," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 895, Central Bank of Chile.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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