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An Empirical Model of Wage Dispersion with Sorting

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Listed:
  • Rasmus Lentz

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • Jesper Bagger

    (University of Aarhus)

Abstract

(negative) sorting results if the match production function is supermodular (submodular). If the production function is modular, no sorting obtains. We propose an identification strategy that allows identification of not only the presence of sorting in matching, but also the type of sorting, negative or positive. Like Eeckhout and Kircher (2008) we find that the commonly used wage decomposition in Abowd, Kramarz, and Margolis (1999) does not in itself identify sorting, although the mechanisms that lead to lack of identification in our model differ from that of the partnership model studied in Eeckhout and Kircher (2008).

Suggested Citation

  • Rasmus Lentz & Jesper Bagger, 2009. "An Empirical Model of Wage Dispersion with Sorting," 2009 Meeting Papers 964, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:964
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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