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Migration to the US and Marital Mobility

  • Rebekka Christopoulou
  • Dean R. Lillard

We combine survey data on British and German immigrants in the US with data on natives in Britain and Germany to estimate the causal effect of migration on educational mobility through cross-national marriage. To control for selective mating, we instrument educational attainment using government spending on education in the years each person was of school-age. To control for selective migration, we instrument the migration decision using inflows of immigrants to the US during puberty and early adulthood. We find that migration causes men to marry up and women to marry down, but self-selection into migration and marriage dampens down these effects.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19495.

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Date of creation: Oct 2013
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Publication status: published as Rebekka Christopoulou & Dean R. Lillard, 2016. "Migration to the US and marital mobility," Review of Economics of the Household, vol 14(3), pages 669-694.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19495
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