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Why Does Intermarriage Increase Immigrant Employment? The Role of Networks

Listed author(s):
  • Furtado, Delia

    ()

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Theodoropoulos, Nikolaos

    ()

    (University of Cyprus)

Social networks are commonly understood to play a large role in the labor market success of immigrants. Using 2000 U.S. Census data, this paper examines whether access to native networks, as measured by marriage to a native, increases the probability of immigrant employment. We start by confirming in both least squares and instrumental variables frameworks that marriage to a native indeed increases immigrant employment rates. Next, we show that the returns to marrying a native are not likely to arise solely from legal status acquired through marriage or characteristics of native spouses. We then present several pieces of evidence suggesting that networks obtained through marriage play an important part in explaining the relationship between marriage decisions and employment.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5080.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2010
Publication status: published in: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy: Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy, 2010, 10 (1), Article 101
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5080
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  1. Xin Meng, 2009. "Intermarriage, language, and economic assimilation process," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1/2), pages 127-144, May.
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