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Marital Matching and Earnings: Evidence from the Unmarried Population in Sweden

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  • Robert A. Nakosteen
  • Olle Westerlund
  • Michael A. Zimmer

Abstract

Social scientists have devoted substantial research to economic basis for matching of men and women in marriage. A common feature of existing studies is their reliance on samples of married couples. The principal shortcoming of spouse data is that spouses’ earnings correlations are contaminated by the partners’ behaviors and other events that occur after marriage and affect their earnings. This study addresses that problem by exploiting a longitudinal data file from the Swedish population. By selecting a sample of married couples in a given year, we retreat through the file to years before the marriage. Using data from the spouses’ single years, we apply the correlation methodology to their earnings. Evidence from the model supports positive assortative mating.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert A. Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael A. Zimmer, 2004. "Marital Matching and Earnings: Evidence from the Unmarried Population in Sweden," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:39:y:2004:i:4:p1033-1044
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    Cited by:

    1. Gavrilova, Evelina, 2013. "A Partner in Crime: Assortative Matching and Bias in the Crime Market," MPRA Paper 50432, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. John M. Nunley & Alan Seals, 2010. "The Effects of Household Income Volatility on Divorce," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 983-1010, July.
    3. Edwards, Ryan D. & Roff, Jennifer, 2016. "What mom and dad’s match means for junior: Marital sorting and child outcomes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 43-56.
    4. Mercan, Murat A., 2011. "Assortative mating and Turkish marriage market," MPRA Paper 32261, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Åström, Johanna, 2009. "The Effects of Assortative Mating on Earnings: Human Capital Spillover or Specialization?," HUI Working Papers 34, HUI Research.
    6. Martin Huber & Giovanni Mellace, 2014. "Testing exclusion restrictions and additive separability in sample selection models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 75-92, August.
    7. Shin, Jaeun & Moon, Sangho, 2006. "Fertility, relative wages, and labor market decisions: A case of female teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 591-604, December.
    8. Luc Arrondel & Nicolas Frémeaux, 2013. ""For richer, for poorer": savings preferences and choice of spouse," PSE Working Papers halshs-00786245, HAL.
    9. Rebekka Christopoulou & Dean R. Lillard, 2016. "Migration to the US and marital mobility," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 669-694, September.
    10. Sigve Tjøtta & Kjell Vaage, 2008. "Public transfers and marital dissolution," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(2), pages 419-437, April.
    11. repec:eee:chieco:v:47:y:2018:i:c:p:27-46 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Martin Dribe & Paul Nystedt, 2013. "Educational Homogamy and Gender-Specific Earnings: Sweden, 1990–2009," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(4), pages 1197-1216, August.
    13. Frémeaux, Nicolas & Lefranc, Arnaud, 2017. "Assortative Mating and Earnings Inequality in France," IZA Discussion Papers 11084, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Younghwan Song, 2007. "The working spouse penalty/premium and married women’s labor supply," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 279-304, September.
    15. Parker, Simon C., 2008. "Entrepreneurship among married couples in the United States: A simultaneous probit approach," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 459-481, June.
    16. Miriam Beblo & Anne Solaz, 2015. "New spouse, same chores? A panel analysis of marital specialization in consecutive unions," Working Papers 217, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    17. Nybom, Martin & Vosters, Kelly, 2015. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 3/2015, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    18. Rannveig Kaldager Hart, 2015. "Earnings and first birth probability among Norwegian men and women 1995-2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(38), pages 1067-1104, November.
    19. Huber, Martin & Mellace, Giovanni, 2011. "Testing instrument validity in sample selection models," Economics Working Paper Series 1145, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    20. Luc Arrondel & Nicolas Frémeaux, 2016. "‘For Richer, For Poorer’: Assortative Mating and Savings Preferences," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(331), pages 518-543, July.
    21. Valerio Filoso, 2010. "Bright and Wealthy: Exploring Assortative Mating," Chapters,in: Institutional and Social Dynamics of Growth and Distribution, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    22. Martin Dribe & Jan Van Bavel & Cameron Campbell, 2012. "Social mobility and demographic behaviour: Long term perspectives," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(8), pages 173-190, March.
    23. Luc Arrondel & Nicolas Frémeaux, 2013. ""For richer, for poorer": savings preferences and choice of spouse," Working Papers halshs-00786245, HAL.
    24. Åström, Johanna, 2011. "The Effects of Spousal Education on Individual Earnings – A Study of Married Swedish Couples," HUI Working Papers 32, HUI Research.

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