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Health, Human Capital Formation and Knowledge Production: Two Centuries of International Evidence

  • Jakob Madsen

Recent medical research shows that health is highly influential for learning and the ability to think laterally; however, past economic studies have failed to empirically examine the influence of health on learning, schooling, and ideas production; the main drivers of growth in endogenous growth models. This paper constructs a measure of health-adjusted educational attainment among the working age population based on their health status during the time they did their education. Using annual data for 21 OECD countries over the past two centuries it is shown that health has been highly influential for the quantity and quality of schooling, innovations and growth.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18461.

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Date of creation: Oct 2012
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18461
Note: HE
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  1. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt & Fabrice Murtin, 2011. "The Relationship Between Health and Growth: When Lucas Meets Nelson-Phelps," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 2(1).
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