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Inefficient Provision of Liquidity

  • Oliver D. Hart
  • Luigi Zingales

We study an economy where the lack of a simultaneous double coincidence of wants creates the need for a relatively safe asset (money). We show that, even in the absence of asymmetric information or an agency problem, the private provision of liquidity is inefficient. The reason is that liquidity affects prices and the welfare of others, and creators do not internalize this. This distortion is present even if we introduce lending and government money. To eliminate the inefficiency the government must restrict the creation of liquidity by the private sector.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17299.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17299.

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Date of creation: Aug 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17299
Note: CF
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  1. Bengt Holmström & Jean Tirole, 2011. "Inside and Outside Liquidity," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262015781, June.
  2. Oliver Hart & John Moore, 1991. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 3906, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Randall Wright & Cyril Monnet & Fabrizio Mattesini, 2009. "Banking: a mechanism design approach," 2009 Meeting Papers 635, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Nicola Gennaioli & Andrei Shleifer & Robert Vishny, 2010. "Financial Innovation and Financial Fragility," Working Papers 2010.114, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  5. Mathias Dewatripont & Jean Tirole, 1994. "The prudential regulation of banks," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9539, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  6. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 1976. "Optimal Financial Crises," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 97-01, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  7. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, . "Liquidity Risk, Liquidity Creation and Financial Fragility: A Theory of Banking," CRSP working papers 476, Center for Research in Security Prices, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago.
  8. Joseph M. Ostroy & Ross M. Starr, 1988. "The Transactions Role of Money," UCLA Economics Working Papers 505, UCLA Department of Economics.
  9. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1989. "On Money as a Medium of Exchange," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 927-54, August.
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